Savory Pumpkin Ravioli: pillows of perfect pumpkin

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You all know how the old rhyme goes…

“Peter, Peter, pumpkin eater, had a wife and couldn’t keep her. He put her in a pumpkin shell and there he kept her very well.”

Curious minds want to know though, what did Mrs. Peter do in there, anyway? Well…

I’m pretty sure she rolled up her sleeves, got out the kitchen tools, and set about making the first batches of pumpkin bread, pumpkin pie, pumpkin cookies, pumpkin rolls, and pumpkin cheesecake. She has the reputation of being a feisty kind of gal, so I’m thinking she wasn’t going to sit about on a tuffet like some others in her time.

No cold porridge here; this lady was a great baker, I say, and we have her to thank for all our favorite pumpkin goodies.

Let’s just be thankful he wasn’t Peter, Peter, lima bean eater.*

To get started, make your favorite homemade pasta dough, or our basic pasta. For the filling, go to Savory Pumpkin Ravioli.

*Just kiddin’. I loves me my lima beans!

Have your fresh pasta dough prepared and ready to go if you’re making the ravioli today. You can also make the filling up to 3 days ahead of time, and store it in your fridge until needed.

Place 1 cup  pumpkin purée into a fine sieve over a catch-all cup. Cover with a layer of plastic wrap, and weigh the pumpkin down with a jar or can. You’re looking to squeeze out liquid, but not squeeze the pumpkin through the sieve; so experiment with different weights if you need to. Leave the pumpkin to drain for about 15 to 2o minutes.

In a medium-sized skillet, sauté:

  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1/3 cup finely diced onion
  • 1/8 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1/2 teaspoon poultry seasoning

The onion will turn translucent, and the spices will get very fragrant.

Add the drained pumpkin. See how thick it is now? You’ll notice, too, there’s no liquid pooled around it in the pan. Just right!

Cook for another minute or two to heat the pumpkin well.

Add 1/2 cup shredded Parmesan cheese (the good kind, no powdered goo). Cook for a few minutes more, until the cheese has begun to melt and the flavors are well married.

Cool the filling to room temperature, then shape into a rough rectangle and wrap well in plastic wrap if you’re chilling to use at a later date.

If making ravioli right away, roughly divide the filling, keeping each piece more or less the same size for even cooking.

Roll out sheets of pasta on the next to thinnest setting of your pasta machine. Remember, a ravioli is made of two layers of pasta, and if they’re too thick you’ll end up with heavy, chunky ravioli.

Gently fold one sheet of pasta in half, and crease it. Unfold. You’ll use the crease to help you space out the filling so that you can fold the top half of the sheet over the bottom.

Like this. Easier to see than to explain.

Brush around the filling mounds with water or an egg wash (1 egg beaten with a splash of water) to help seal the two sheets together. Fold the top half over the bottom half, and press down with your fingers to seal.

Use a sharp biscuit cutter or knife to cut out each individual ravioli. I’m going fancy here and using a 2″ scalloped cutter.

At this point, you can place the cut-out ravioli on a lightly floured baking sheet and place them in the fridge until you’re ready to cook them – but no more than an hour or so, or your pasta will begin to dry out. Dry pasta = cracked and leaky ravioli.

Cook the fresh pasta in salted, gently boiling water for about 4 to 5 minutes, or until they float. Once they float, cook for another minute or two. Feel free to taste one as you go along; it’s really the only way to know exactly when the pasta is done.

According to Rosemary, my pasta instructor, the water that you cook pasta in should taste like the ocean. It doesn’t make your pasta taste overly salty, but it’s much, much better tasting than pasta cooked in plain water.

You can serve the ravioli as is, with a touch of butter or drizzle of light olive oil. I like to sizzle a little butter in a pan with some sage leaves and sauté the cooked pasta in it for a minute before serving.

These ravioli would be excellent with a light cream sauce, too, topped with a few pine nuts. Hmmm, being locked away in a pumpkin with a plateful of these ravioli wouldn’t exactly be a punishment, now would it?

Please make, rate, and review our recipe for Savory Pumpkin Ravioli.

Print just the recipe.

See other great fresh pasta recipes.

MaryJane Robbins
About

MaryJane Robbins grew up in Massachusetts and moved to Vermont 20 years ago. After teaching young children for 15 years, she changed careers and joined King Arthur Flour in 2005. MaryJane began working on King Arthur Flour's baker’s hotline in 2006, and the blog team ...

comments

  1. marysdreyer

    You could use purchased wonton wrappers to speed things up, or filo, and bake it in little triangles. Yum!
    What a great appetizer that would make. Thanks for sharing!~ MaryJane

    Reply
  2. mdlrvrmuncher

    I don’t cook Indian or North African cuisine so I have no turmeric and if I did it’s probably > infinity years old. Do you think ground ginger would be too strong a flavor?
    I think ginger would be really nice. Maybe do 1/16 teaspoon in place of the tumeric. Elisabeth

    Reply
  3. jlgirl617

    Hi MaryJane. Question: in America’s Test Kitchen’s recipe for pumpkin pie, they suggest cooking down the pumpkin instead of draining it because the juices are packed with flavor. If I were going to try doing that, would I want to cook it down separately or with the onion et al? Thanks!
    P.S.- I’ve used the “cooking down” method for pumpkin bread to squeeze an extra half-can of pumpkin into it, and it’s awesome! Cook it with some of your diced soft ginger and maple syrup and go to town. :)
    I bet the the flavor is so pronounced! I will let MJ speak to this one but I would guess you would cook it separately. Elisabeth

    I hadn’t heard of that but ATK is usually spot on with their research, so I’d say give it a try. Personally, I’d cook it down separately to keep the onion and spices from getting overcooked. Thanks so much for sharing this. ~MaryJane

    Reply
  4. elsa

    Recently I enjoyed pumpkin ravioli in an Italian restaurant in Chicago. It was served with a wonderful balsamic sauce. When asked about the sauce, the waiter said the balsamic vinegar was cooked/reduced which eliminated the acidity and then cream was added. Of course there were other ingredients which were not divulged. It was superb! I’ll have to try these ravioli and attempt the sauce.
    That sounds wonderful. I bet if you did a recipe search online for a balsamic cream sauce, you’d find a few to use as reference. It is one of the “new classics”. Let us know how it turns out. ~ MaryJane

    Reply
  5. Jess

    These look so good! I’m wondering if the Parmesan in the filling is necessary for the ravioli structure, or if it’s just for taste. I’m non-dairy, so I’d like to leave it out. Thanks!
    Jess, you can definitely leave it out, it is just in there for flavor. You may want to consider adding the potato flour though, to make a nice smooth filling. ~ MaryJane

    Reply
  6. stephanieflagg

    So this is one of those “not really helpful, but had to share” reviews/comments – I haven’t made the ravioli, but seeing this post on Satruday morning inspired me to make the filling, added some breakfast sausage, and used it to fill an omelette and topped it with a bit of chedder cheese.

    Y-U-M!!!

    Even though the husband commented “Oh, that’s way too much for me!” he practically licked the plate clean.

    So savory pumpkin filling – not just for ravioli any more. :)
    Hi there,
    Actually, MY husband saw your comment and now he’s thinking pumpkin filled omlettes for brunch this weekend. Thanks for the inspiration! ~ MaryJane

    Reply
  7. ask

    I’m wondering if I can use potato starch instead of potato flour?
    Can’t wait to try this recipe!
    Yes, you sure can and in an equal amount. Enjoy! Elisabeth

    Reply
  8. gaa

    These ravioli are outstanding!! Made them yesterday and served them with a balsamic parmesan cream sauce! These are over the moon!!
    My dinner invitation must have gotten lost in the mail. :( Really though, I’m so glad you enjoyed them. ~ MaryJane

    Reply
  9. Holly

    I made these tonight after having a half a can of pumpkin puree leftover and I hated to throw it out. These were so delicious! I didn’t have turmeric, so I just left it out and like a previous reviewer, I made a balsamic Parmesan sauce to go over the top. Excellent meal!

    Holly, so glad you put that pumpkin purée to good use. Thanks for sharing – PJH

    Reply
  10. M.E. Ram

    I lived in Asia for many years and savory pumpkin ravioli was often on the menu at Italian restaurants. They were usually served with melted butter and either ground sage or delicately sauteed sliced sage, never a creamy sauce. Yummy! now I can try to make them at home.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Yes, freezing is a great idea. Just allow to dry out some before freezing. If you are going to layer them in an air tight container, use parchment or wax paper in between the layers. Or flash freeze and then store in an air tight container. Elisabeth

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