Citrus Surprise Grapefruit Cake

star rating (9) rate this recipe »
dairy free, whole grain
Recipe photo
Hands-on time:
Baking time:
Total time:
Yield: Two 8" or 9" round layers, one 13" x 9" x 2" cake, or 24 cupcakes

Recipe photo

This recipe first appeared in our King Arthur Flour Whole Grain Baking book in 2006. Pairing whole wheat and citrus makes for an excellent combination. The whole wheat's sweetness is brought out by the tang of the citrus; and the earthy flavor of the wheat marries well with that of grapefruit. Using oil and egg whites makes for a very light cake that holds its structure well with nary a sign of heaviness from the whole grains.

Citrus Surprise Grapefruit Cake

star rating (9) rate this recipe »
dairy free, whole grain
Hands-on time:
Baking time:
Total time:
Yield: Two 8" or 9" round layers, one 13" x 9" x 2" cake, or 24 cupcakes
Published: 03/21/2012

Ingredients

  • 2 cups King Arthur 100% White Whole Wheat Flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 5 large egg yolks, whites reserved
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
  • 1/3 cup water
  • 1/4 cup fresh grapefruit juice
  • 1 tablespoon freshly grated grapefruit peel (zest)
  • 5 large egg whites
  • 1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar

Tips from our bakers

  • Cream Cheese Frosting is delightful on this cake, as is Italian Buttercream. A few drops of pink food coloring combined with a drop or two of orange food coloring will give you a beautiful "pink grapefruit" colored icing.

Directions

1) Preheat the oven to 350°F. Lightly grease two 9" round cake pans, line with parchment, and lightly grease the parchment. Set aside.

2) Whisk together the flour, baking powder, and salt in a medium bowl; set aside.

3) Combine the egg yolks and oil. Beat at low speed, using your stand mixer or a hand mixer. Slowly add the sugar as the mixture thickens. Add the water and grapefruit juice. Beat on medium speed for 3 minutes, stopping occasionally to scrape the bottom and sides of the bowl. Gently fold in the flour mixture and grapefruit zest with a wide rubber spatula.

4) In a separate bowl, free of any oil or grease, beat the egg whites until foamy. Add the cream of tartar and continue to beat on high speed until soft peaks form.

5) Gently fold the beaten whites into the batter by thirds. Combine only until traces of white remain; don't over-mix.

6) Divide the cake batter between the two pans and bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until a cake tester tests clean and the cake begins to pull away from the sides of the pan. For a 9" x 13" pan, bake 25 to 35 minutes. For cupcakes, bake 15 to 18 minutes.

7) Cool in the pan for 10 minutes before turning out onto a rack to cool completely. Frost as desired; see suggestions in "tips" at left.

Yield: two 9" round cake layers; one 9" x 13" x 2" sheet cake, or 24 cupcakes.

Reviews

1
  • star rating 04/01/2013
  • Houda from Los angeles
  • Great recipe..everybody liked it and no one could tell its whole wheat flower..thank u KA
  • 08/22/2012
  • Baker Wannabe from KAF Community
  • Hi, I rarely see KAF products here in Asia, what other flours can I substitute that would work well for this recipe?
    If you cannot find white whole wheat, you can substitute traditional whole wheat flour. Just keep in mind that the cake will be darker and slightly more "wheaty" tasting from the traditional whole wheat. ~Mel
  • star rating 06/07/2012
  • karbar from KAF Community
  • I am always looking for new & different recipes for baking, and KAF never disappoints! This cake got rave reviews from my husband's co-workers! I was looking for something that sounded light & "summery" and this hit the spot! I made a 9x13 sheet cake & tinted the cream cheese frosting like it said in the hints. I didn't have time to do any fancy decorating, so I just sprinkled pastel nonpareils all over, and placed some flower sugar decorations on top. (I always stock up on the sugar decorations when they are on sale-you never know when they will come in handy!) KAF has some of the best recipes ever! Keep coming up with the great baking ideas!
  • star rating 05/30/2012
  • cartpro from KAF Community
  • I made this for Teacher Appreciation luncheon as a nice dairy-free option. They were tasty without frosting but even better with cream cheese on top - isn't everything? Next time I will try using four eggs. i found it a little "eggy" and scooped out 6 extra cupcakes, but the first 12 were a little more shrunken than the last 12. The whole wheat (I ground my own white wheat to use it fresh) was a great complement to the grapefruit and not at all heavy. All in all a tasty treat, something a little different and not so overwhelmingly flavoured that you think "oh boy, that's really grapefruity"
    Fresh ground whole wheat really is sweet (both in process and flavor) - thanks for sharing your tips. Happy Baking! Irene @ KAF
  • star rating 05/30/2012
  • Sharon from Logansport, IN
  • As noted by Irene at KAF, white whole wheat flour is not the name KAF came up with, but is the what the wheat itself is called. Regular whole wheat flour is made from red winter wheat, pastry flour is from sping wheat, etc. White wheat does have a brighter color and taste. Some do not like it, preferring the regular whole wheat. KAF, however, is not to blame for the name. It is what it is!
  • 05/30/2012
  • mmfmcookies from KAF Community
  • I just wanted to comment on the last comment that white wheat is the name of a type of flour, King Arthur did not name the flour, you can find white wheat in all kinds of stores by all kinds of brands ( not as good as King Arthur's though). I use it in all kinds of recipes without any weird color or taste. I love providing wonderful tasting "goodies" that have whole grain in them!
  • 05/29/2012
  • tbelles14 from KAF Community
  • My husband can't have grapefruit, but I love it. I'm going to have to find someone who likes grapefruit to share this cake with. Have not tried it, but it sounds delicious. Hmm, I bet it would make a great cupcake.
  • 05/29/2012
  • joyfull40 from KAF Community
  • For Irene@KAF Your white whole wheat flour bag has the wording, "Unbleached White Whole Wheat Flour. That is what caught my attention. I was not looking for what kind of wheat, the flour was made from, I was looking for a KA white whole wheat flour mixture, similar to the flour I've been using, as I've been quite pleased with the majority of my past purchases from KAF. Again I have to say, the wording 'White Whole Wheat flour' can be misleading to some customers, myself included. The description that accompanies the flour uses the word/s, light, lighter, there is no reference to the word "white" except the name on the bag. I stand by what I say, the name of this flour is misleading & needs to be corrected.
    Thank you for your feedback as we do appreciate hearing from all of our customers. Your comments are noted and will be passed on to our marketing team. Thank you. Elisabeth
  • 05/29/2012
  • joyfull40 from KAF Community
  • Meaning no offence to KA Flour, I have to say the name of this flour is misleading to unsuspecting customers. I purchased this flour expected it to be white in color as the name implied, but found there was no whiteness to the flour at all. I did try the flour in a bread recipe I usually make with Nutri Flour, a blend of unbleached white & ground wheat bran, but it was not well received. The finished bread had an offputting color & taste, with the color being the most offputting of all. I've commented on this flour once before as I thought it was misleading of KA flour to label the flour as "white" whole wheat at that time, & thought my comment might contribute to bringing about a change in the name of the flour. Now I see my comment must have meant very little as the flour is being promotied as white whole wheat flour, once again. As said once before, I honestly think this is misleading to customers. It would be more honest of KA Flour to re-label this flour as "LIGHT" whole wheat flour, so customers will have a better idea of what they are buying.
    White Whole Wheat flour is named after the white wheat berries ground to make the flour. Our farmers call this "sweet wheat" as it doesn't have the bitter taste some detect when eating "regular" whole wheat flour made from grinding red wheat berries. We do appreciate and honor your viewpoint and comments. Irene @ KAF
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