Buttery Seeded Naan

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Yield: 4 large breads

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This teardrop-shaped, leavened flatbread is a staple in South Asia, where it takes many slightly different forms. This version comes from Northwest India.

Buttery Seeded Naan

star rating (14) rate this recipe »
Hands-on time:
Baking time:
Total time:
Yield: 4 large breads
Published: 07/26/2010

Ingredients

Bread

  • 4 cups King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
  • 2 teaspoons instant yeast
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1/2 to 1 1/2 teaspoons salt*
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 2/3 to 3/4 cup milk**
  • 1/2 cup plain whole-milk yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons ghee (clarified butter) or melted butter
  • 1 large egg
  • *Since naan is often eaten with salty foods, it doesn't include much salt itself. If you plan on eating this bread alone, you'll want to either increase the amount of salt, as indicated; or sprinkle with sea salt once it's baked.
  • **Use the greater amount in winter or in a dry climate; the lesser amount in summer or a humid climate.

Topping, optional

  • 1 egg white beaten with 1 teaspoon water, optional
  • seeds of your choice
  • melted butter or ghee

Directions

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1) Place all of the ingredients into a bowl, and mix and knead to make a smooth, fairly stiff dough. This will take about 7 minutes in a stand mixer.

2) Place the dough in a lightly greased bowl or large (8-cup) measuring cup, and allow it to rise for 1 to 2 hours, till it's doubled in bulk. Dough made with less salt will rise more quickly. Toward the end of the rising time, preheat your oven to 475°F — with a pizza stone on the bottom rack, if you intend to use one.

3) Divide the dough into four pieces, and shape each piece into a rough oval. Cover and let rest for 15 minutes, while your oven continues to heat.

4) Shape each piece into a 10" long, teardrop-shaped loaf. Place 2 loaves on each of 2 lightly greased or parchment-lined baking sheets.

5) If you're using a stone, place two breads at a time onto the stone. Bake for 2 minutes on each side, till golden brown. Remove from the oven, and cool on a rack.

6) If you're baking on a baking sheet, brush the breads with beaten egg white, if desired, and top with seeds. Place on a lower rack of the oven, and bake for 7 to 8 minutes, or until the breads are puffed and golden brown.

7) Remove the breads from the oven, and brush with ghee or melted butter, if desired. Serve warm, or at room temperature.

Yield: 4 large breads.

Reviews

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  • star rating 01/17/2015
  • Nancy Foster from Clemson, SC
  • My family loved this bread. I hadn't expected such enthusiasm for something so "exotic." I served it with mulligatawny and my husband split the leftovers longways for sandwiches. I made the dough in a mixer with a dough hook. I used ghee. I used a preheated pizza stone (Emile Henry rectangular) in the bottom rack of my oven and formed the "loaves" on parchment paper then dropped them paper and all onto the stone. I found I needed to let them cook for 3 -4 minutes on each side. I brushed them liberally with melted ghee while they were still hot. I've only had store bought naan before so can't comment on authenticity but these were well beyond store bought as saw as taste and texture were concerned.
  • star rating 09/20/2013
  • jlgirl617 from KAF Community
  • Very good. It ends up being a bit heavy; I think there may be a little too much fat...? I doubled the recipe, except the yeast which I kept the same. After the rise (1 1/2 hours or so, having used 2 teaspoons of salt for the doubled recipe), I shaped the breads and then let them sit for about 20 minutes. Instead of using the oven, I heated a cast-iron skillet over medium heat (higher at first, but that gave me a burnt naan) and cooked them for about 2 minutes (give or take) per side, usually less on the second side than on the first. That cooked them all the way through and gave them the streaky-spotty browning that I like on naan. I did give the breads another pull before putting them on the griddle. Mine didn't puff (in the pita-way) like I read that some others' did, so I think this is the method I would use next time as well. After they came out of the pan, I brushed them with garlic butter (heat 2-3 T or so of butter until foamy and then gently cook 2 cloves of garlic in it for a minute or so, until it loses its "raw" smell). Again, it was a little heavy; next time I may use lowfat yogurt to see how that works. But everyone ate it and liked it, so can't complain too much!
  • star rating 10/21/2012
  • alphill from KAF Community
  • The naan was light, fluffy and delicious! I used whole milk vanilla yoghurt as I forgotten to purchase plain yoghurt and they still worked out great. Why buy store bought when these are so simple to make and yield a great product! Thanks KAF!
  • star rating 02/26/2012
  • ealeisa1 from KAF Community
  • For dinner rolls, it is Ok. For Naan, not possible. It does not taste or smell anything like Naan. What is the purpose of adding butter/eggs and cooking in a hot degree oven? It just does not make any sense. I do not believe all of the 5-star reviews.
    I am sorry this recipe was a disappointment. Perhaps, it is not one of the more traditional recipes. Adding egg and butter will create a tender texture. Elisabeth
  • star rating 01/25/2012
  • gviolette from KAF Community
  • I was leery of baked naan but decided to try this recipe. The first batch I baked I turned after 2 minutes. Realized after that that they would need longer to cook and reread directions. The second batch I cooked according to directions. Sadly, the first batch turned out better, they at least puffed up and were edible. The second batch was thick and dense, not even good for dipping in soup. Overall the texture was too dense for naan and the flavor was only ok. I'm glad I tried the recipe but have since found a stovetop naan recipe and love it.
  • star rating 01/16/2012
  • srizilla from KAF Community
  • First,let me say I'm Indian. Second, let me say that my family really enjoyed this bread, from my 2 and 4 y olds to myself and husband (not Indian),and it was pretty easy to put together. Third, I love king arthur and in the last 1.5-2y w their phenomenal recipes (i hate baking a recipe that isnt accompanied by reviews now!), amazing products and incomparable customer service,i have rediscovered my long forgotten love of baking and discovered a whole new world of breads and pies. All that being said, this is a tasty flatbread but to me was more like a pita in texture than naan. I tried rolling them to the specified size and they were very soft and bready. Tried rolling them thinner and they got crunchy. Another naan recipe on this site directs stretching them--method isn't specified in this recipe but I can't imagine that would alter the fact the bread has a crust and inner pocket rather than the soft,thin naans w bubbles but no inner pocket that I have had in my life and was hoping for. It would seem perhaps its a different flour at least in part altogether, and not whole grain like the other recipes on this site. I'll have to keep looking. This is tasty but even made on a stone it's not like naan back home.
  • star rating 01/11/2012
  • srizilla from KAF Community
  • First,let me say I'm Indian. Second, let me say that my family really enjoyed this bread, from my 2 and 4 y olds to myself and husband (not Indian),and it was pretty easy to put together. Third, I love King Arthur and in the last 1.5-2y w their phenomenal recipes (I hate baking a recipe that isn't accompanied by reviews now!), amazing products and incomparable customer service,I have rediscovered my long forgotten love of baking and discovered a whole new world of breads and pies. All that being said, this is a tasty flatbread but to me was more like a pita in texture than naan. I tried rolling them to the specified size and they were very soft and bread-like. I tried rolling them thinner and they got crunchy. Another naan recipe on this site directs stretching them--method isn't specified in this recipe but I can't imagine that would alter the fact the bread has a crust and inner pocket rather than the soft,thin naans w bubbles but no inner pocket that I have had in my life and was hoping for. It would seem perhaps its a different flour at least in part altogether, and not whole grain like the other recipes on this site. I'll have to keep looking. This is tasty but even made on a stone it's not like naan back home.
  • star rating 08/11/2011
  • anyasmifya from KAF Community
  • This bread came out great. Instead of cooking it in the oven I used the charcoal grill. Quick and Delicious!
  • star rating 11/09/2010
  • Cupcake Princess from KAF Community
  • I served this delicious naan with vegetable curry. I really liked how soft and tender this naan was and how it was made with yogurt. I used active dry yeast instead of instant yeast which I dissolved in a little bit of water with 1 teaspoon of the sugar. Instead of brushing the unbaked naans with egg white wash and sprinkling some seeds on top, I mixed together a 1/4 cup of melted butter with 2 tablespoons of chopped cilantro and 2 minced garlic cloves and just brushed that mixture on top of the naans before putting them in the oven. The only problem I had was that they got really poofy in the oven instead of staying flat like how naan usually is, but they still turned out beautiful and very very tasty. Next time i'm not going to add the baking powder and see how they turn out. Thanks for the great recipe I will be making this again!
  • star rating 11/01/2010
  • milkwithknives from KAF Community
  • Yummy! I made this bread for our Halloween party on Saturday to go with soup, and every bite was gone before I went home. I used a baking sheet and baked eight minutes, but I believe I'll start checking on it at six or seven minutes next time just to be sure I don't get it too brown. The dough was a bit sticky in the beginning, but after it had time to rise it was absolutely silky, and the bread was so tender and soft. People were dipping it in the soup, the salad dressing, roasted squash, everything. Oh also, I used half white whole wheat flour and nobody could tell. Thanks so much for the recipe and your wonderful photo lesson. My first try at naan was a smashing success.
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