Heirloom Tomato and Fresh Pasta Salad

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dairy free
Recipe photo
Hands-on time:
Total time:
Yield: 3 to 4 servings

Recipe photo

This pasta dish is inspired by the many varieties of tomatoes coming into fashion. If heirloom tomatoes aren't available to you, a combination of vine and cherry tomatoes is a good substitute.

Heirloom Tomato and Fresh Pasta Salad

star rating (6) rate this recipe »
dairy free
Hands-on time:
Total time:
Yield: 3 to 4 servings
Published: 03/13/2012

Ingredients

Pasta

Tomatoes

  • 2 tablespoons garlic oil or plain olive oil
  • 4 cloves garlic, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 2 pounds heirloom tomatoes, cored and sliced
  • 1/2 teaspoon flaked sea salt; Maldon sea salt is a good choice
  • 1/2 cup fresh whole basil leaves

Tips from our bakers

  • For soft, tender pasta, use Italian-Style Flour, as directed above. For pasta with a little more texture and bite, use 2 cups (9 1/4 ounces) King Arthur Perfect Pasta Blend, or 2 1/4 cups (9 1/2 ounces) King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour.

Directions

1) To make the pasta: Combine the flour, eggs, and salt in a food processor and pulse until a smooth dough forms. Or mix with a hand or stand mixer; or by hand.

2) Knead the dough into a ball, wrap it in plastic, and set it aside to rest for 30 minutes.

3) For the tomatoes, heat a small, heavy-bottomed saucepan over low heat and add the oil. Once the oil is hot, add the garlic, and cook until it turns golden. Transfer the garlic to a paper towel to dry, reserving the oil.

4) Combine the tomatoes with the oil, garlic, and salt in a large bowl, tossing to combine. Set aside while you make the pasta.

5) Run the dough through a pasta machine on its thickest setting. Repeat the process, flouring as necessary, gradually reducing the thickness to the last setting. Cut along the length of pasta at foot-long intervals, then cut each into 3/4"-wide strands.

6) Bring 4 quarts water + 1 tablespoon salt to a boil. Drop the pasta into the boiling water, stir, then cook for 4 minutes.

7) Drain the pasta, and refresh under cold running water to stop the cooking. Continue to drain the pasta in a colander for 10 minutes or so, then toss with the tomatoes and fresh basil.

8) Serve immediately; or refrigerate and serve later.

Yield: 3 to 4 servings.

Reviews

1
  • star rating 06/24/2012
  • britavanhorne from KAF Community
  • I made this pasta using 2 cups of KAF Italian-Style flour and 1/4 cup of semolina. Cooked it for 4 minutes and it was perfect -- firm, not mushy. I tossed mine with herb pesto, delicious! The dough was even easy to roll by hand into thin sheets. This is my new go-to for fresh pasta.
  • star rating 06/15/2012
  • GlutenFreeGrandma from KAF Community
  • I am subscribed to your GLUTEN FREE emails and received this recipe. This particular flour is NOT gluten free! I think you should remove the statement about American flours being high in gluten (that is misleading - I thought this product was gluten free until I read the fine print). If you do eat gluten free - DO NOT BUY THIS PRODUCT!
    I apologize that you received a non-gluten free email. Please give our customer service team a call at 1-800-827-6836 so that we can make sure your email preferences are up to date. You may want to try this gluten free pasta recipe. ~Mel
  • star rating 06/15/2012
  • brendajohnson from KAF Community
  • I need to make this! We have a pasta machine that we've never used, and it's high time to get it into action. I also think I should try the Italian flour for my Spaetzel. I bet that would make it extra good. Any suggestions on that?
    Give us a call on the Baker's Hotline and we'll be happy to help with suggestions! ~Mel
  • star rating 06/15/2012
  • bryancar from KAF Community
  • Homemade pasta cooks much faster than store bought/dried pasta. Boiling your home made pasta in salted water (in my experience) for four minutes would likely turn it into near mush, as opposed to al dente.
    We had a lot of success in our test kitchen with this recipe as written. Feel free to adjust the cooking time for the pasta to fit your taste. ~Mel
  • star rating 06/15/2012
  • djward from KAF Community
  • Thanks, Frank! The chart is most helpful. Any chance for adding a Grams column as well as Onces for those of us with Metric Minds?
    I'll pass along your encouragement. Maybe the next revision will include this additional option. Frank @ KAF.
  • star rating 06/15/2012
  • djward from KAF Community
  • I have not made the pasta, so my rating is not the issue here. Reading the recipe, I see you call for 2 1/4 C of flour. Changing to the Grams measure, the amount is 241 g. How can this be? You state elsewhere that 1 C of flour weighs 120 g, so according to my calculations, the recipe should call for 270 g of flour. One wonders if thIs discrepancy is only with this recipe, or if there are other instances where the conversion is off?
    I apologize for any confusion. The recipe is correct as posted. Italian-Style flour is lighter per cup (1 cup=106 grams) than All-Purpose. 106g x 2.25c = 238.5g, we rounded up for easier scaling. You can find all the flour conversions on the Master Weight Chart, here:http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipe/master-weight-chart.html Frank @ KAF.
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