Gravy for Hot Turkey Sandwiches

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Gravy for Hot Turkey Sandwiches

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Published prior to 2008

Hot turkey sandwiches assume gravy and, to make gravy, we'll assume the bird you've been feasting on is still in the roasting pan. If you've served the turkey on a platter, cover and refrigerate the roasting pan with all its juices and bits rather than washing it. Also on Sunday, place the giblets (all those questionable looking organs, the neck, the liver, the heart and the gizzard) that you find in the little bag stuffed in the cavity of the turkey, into a saucepan and cover completely with water, about 3 1/2 to 4 cups, keeping in mind that you want about 2 cups of stock for the gravy and 1 for the casserole. You'll lose quite a bit through evaporation, so factor this in as well. Bring this to a boil and then simmer gently until the giblets are thoroughly cooked. Add a bouillon cube if you wish. Cover and chill.

Because the roasting pan has chilled, the fat will have risen to the surface and solidified. To make the gravy you want about 4 tablespoons of fat, so take a spoon and skim off the excess. Don't bother measuring it. Just give a guess; a bit more or less isn't critical.

Place the pan on a burner and turn the heat on low. As the drippings begin to heat, sprinkle about 4 tablespoons of King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour over the surface. With the back of the spoon, slowly moosh the flour into the drippings until you've created a paste. Scrape off and blend in all the browned juices on the bottom of the pan. Allow this mixture to begin to bubble and brown. This gives the flour a chance to absorb the drippings and develop a meaty, not raw, flavor.

While you're playing with the flour and drippings, heat the pan of giblets until the stock is slightly warm. Pour off as much of the stock as you can, remembering that you want about 2 cups. If you're short, the balance can be plain water or bouillon. Slowly add the stock to the pan stirring with your spoon, or better, a wire whisk*. After the stock has been added, let the mixture cook for about 5 minutes. Add more stock if it becomes too thick (you'll lose some liquid through evaporation) and then taste it for flavor. You may need to add some salt, plain or seasoned.

If you're a lover of giblet gravy, mince the giblets (you can add the neck meat minced as well if you wish) and stir them in. If you want to disguise the giblets, pour the mixture into a blender and whirl them into anonymity. Reheat (keep adding stock if you need to), pour into a warmed gravy boat and serve beside a platter of sliced turkey and fresh-from-the oven slices of Hearth Bread.

This recipe reprinted from The Baking Sheet Newsletter, Vol. III, No. 3, January-February 1992 issue.