Low-Fat Date-Nut Bread

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Low-Fat Date-Nut Bread

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Published prior to 2008

This tasty low-fat bread stays nice and moist due to its "steam bath."

1/2 cup yellow cornmeal
1/2 cup rye flour (white, medium, or pumpernickel)
1/2 cup King Arthur 100% White Whole Wheat Flour
1/4 cup dried buttermilk powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 tablespoons non-diastatic malt powder or sugar
3/4 cup chopped dates
3/4 cup walnut or pecan pieces
1/2 cup molasses
3/4 cup water

In a medium-sized mixing bowl, whisk together all of the dry ingredients until well-blended. Stir the molasses into the water, and combine the wet and dry ingredients, mixing just until everything is moistened.

Butter or grease the inside of your 1-pound steamer pan (or equivalent; a pudding steamer, or "1-pound coffee can"-size pan, about 4 1/2 inches wide and 6 inches tall, will do the trick). Spoon the batter into the pan, and cover it with a piece of greased aluminum foil. Put 2 to 3 inches of water in a covered saucepan taller than your steamer pan, and place the steamer in the saucepan. Bring the water to a simmer. Cover the pan, and simmer the bread for 3 hours, replenishing with additional simmering water as needed, until the cake is done (a cake tester inserted into the center will come out clean). Remove the pan from the saucepan, allow it to cool for 30 minutes, then turn the bread out onto a rack to cool completely. Yield: 12 1/2-inch slices.

Reviews

1
  • star rating 09/03/2014
  • Roxy from Palo Alto, CA
  • Made this using buttermilk, (I had it for once!), instead of water, and brown sugar. The flavor is good, but the cornmeal remained a little gritty even after 3 hours of steaming. I have a pudding basin, and have made steamed puddings before, but I find steaming kinda nerve wracking (I'm always afraid of boiling the pan dry). I prefer two other excellent low fat recipes on this site: Date Pudding and Tea Brack.
    Thanks for your review, Roxy. When we test drive a recipe for the first time, we try to make it just as written - then may sub ingredients just one ingredient at a time to see how they compare to the original (or control group?) recipe. We're glad you found other excellent recipes on our website. Happy Baking! Irene@KAF
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