Old-Fashioned Oatmeal Bread

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whole grain
Recipe photo
Hands-on time:
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Total time:
Yield: 1 large loaf

Recipe photo

What's a nicer way to begin the day than with a warm, crunchy slice of oatmeal toast? With all the great new artisan breads out there, some of America's favorite pan breads seem to be getting short shrift. Personally, we'd no more give up our white, oatmeal and whole wheat sandwich loaves than we would our favorite baguettes or focaccia. Each has its place in our world, and there's nothing like good old American pan bread for sandwiches and toast.

Old-Fashioned Oatmeal Bread

star rating (42) rate this recipe »
whole grain
Hands-on time:
Baking time:
Total time:
Yield: 1 large loaf
Published: 02/24/2015

Ingredients

Tips from our bakers

  • Add 1 tablespoon granular lecithin, if desired, for increased softness.

Directions

1) Combine the boiling water, oats, oil, and molasses in a large bowl, or in the bucket of your bread machine set on the dough cycle. Stir, and allow to cool until barely warm, about 15 to 20 minutes.

2) Add the remaining ingredients and mix and knead them — by hand, mixer, or bread machine — to form a soft, slightly sticky, craggy dough.

3) Cover the bowl, and allow the dough to rise until it's puffy though not necessarily doubled in bulk, about 1 1/2 hours. If you're using a bread machine, allow the machine to complete its dough cycle.

4) Turn the dough out onto a lightly greased or floured work surface. Shape it into a log, and place it in a well-greased 8 1/2" x 4 1/2" loaf pan. Cover the pan with plastic wrap and allow the bread to rise for 45 to 60 minutes. When fully risen, the crown of the bread should be about 1" above the rim of the pan.

5) Remove the plastic, and bake the loaf for about 35 minutes in a pre-heated 350°F. A digital thermometer will register at least 190°F when inserted into the center. This bread can brown quickly, so check during the baking time and tent it lightly with foil if needed.

6) Remove the loaf from the oven, turn it out of the pan, and cool it on its side on a rack. The bread is delicate coming out of the oven, and setting it upright on the rack may cause it to sag.

7) Allow the bread to cool completely before slicing. This bread makes excellent toast, peanut butter-banana sandwiches, turkey clubs, or any kind of sandwich. It's also yummy just sliced and spread with butter and jam.

Yield: 1 loaf, 16 slices.

Reviews

1 2345  All  
  • star rating 04/02/2015
  • gshaughnessey from KAF Community
  • This is a nice but fragile loaf. I found it too fragile for sandwiches. I prefer a denser loaf with a stronger oatmeal flavor.
    We hope rolled oats were used, not instant oats.....using bread flour instead of the all purpose may give you the firmer, more chewy loaf you are looking for. Happy Baking! Irene@KAF
  • star rating 03/19/2015
  • westin16 from KAF Community
  • I baked 2 loaves yesterday changing the recipe only a little. I substituted 4 cups of white wheat flour for 4 cups of the white flour, and added 2 tbl of whole wheat gluten. I did not have bread enhancer, and I needed to add a tad more water. The results were wonderful. Only half a loaf was left this morning; the toast was delicious. This recipe is now a family favorite.
  • star rating 03/13/2015
  • Jennifer from Hummelstown, PA
  • This bread was very easy to make in a bread machine. It is moist and delicious and freezes well.
  • star rating 03/10/2015
  • arlad2 from KAF Community
  • Liked the bread, good flavor. Added 1/4 cup applesauce and more flour to handle as this made it very wet. Bread when sliced, breaks easily. How can I fix this still using applesauce?

    Try boosting the oven temperature by 25 degrees to help the structure set. Also be sure not to let the dough over-proof as this can make for a crumbly bread. As soon as you poke the dough and the indent does not spring back, you should move on to the next step. Hopefully this gives you an apple-sauce slice that holds up. Happy baking! --Kye@KAF

  • star rating 03/09/2015
  • Connie T from Modesto CA
  • Made this twice using my bread machine. The first loaf was baked in the 8 x 4 pan as directed. The bread rose way too high and faster than the times in the recipe. It was delicious. Made it again using a larger pan, 9 x 5 type. It rose well in the bread machine and quickly after shaping it and putting it in the bread pan. I didn't wait as long as the directions, placed in the oven in less than an hour and it had a large oven spring. It was great, no one could wait until cool. I would double the recipe but in my bread machine, it just would overflow way too much. Best bread recipe I've ever tried. Will be my favorite, as is.
  • star rating 03/08/2015
  • alleygirl1 from KAF Community
  • Made this today. Had all ingredients except the whole grain bread improver. Which I have now added to my wish list. The loaf almost rose an inch above the rim but not evenly across the top. I think it cooked up nicely and is really delicious!
  • star rating 03/08/2015
  • Beth from Dunnellon, FL
  • Loved this bread. I made it as is, except used real milk, honey instead of molasses except for a little bit of molasses for color, and used half white whole wheat flour with a little vital wheat gluten. Wondered if I could add some cracked wheat to it and what modifications I would have to make. I love cracked wheat and oatmeal and thought they would make a great tasting bread.

    Beth, you can add 1/4 c. cracked wheat to this recipe for added crunch, flavor, and fiber in place of 1/4 c. of the oats. Your dough may need about 1 tablespoon of extra water to become fully hydrated as well. Hopefully this gives you the whole grain fix you are looking for! --Kye@KAF

  • star rating 03/03/2015
  • mrmoran from KAF Community
  • Pretty incredible. Very high-rising loaf -- I used 1Tbs each of Whole-Grain Bread Improver and lecithin, per the old recipe, and it rose like a dream. More importanty, it's delicious!
  • star rating 02/27/2015
  • Monica from New Windsor, NY
  • I made this bread using the recipe that appeared on the website until a few days ago. That recipe called for a Tbsp. of granular lecithin in addition to the whole grain bread improver. I used all of the listed ingredients, except swapped out some of the molasses for honey. It rose much faster than the listed times, and because the old recipe made no mention of turning the bread on its side to cool, my loaf did sag slightly. Despite that, the bread was absolutely delicious, very moist, and stayed fresh much longer than most loaves because of the lecithin. I will put this bread into my regular "rotation" of loaves, but I will continue to use the old recipe, and make a note to leave the loaf on its side. Any particular reason why the recipe was changed?
    I'm not quite sure why this recipe was changed, but it's certainly fine to continue adding the tablespoon of granular lecithin if you enjoy the results. Barb@KAF
1 2345  All  
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