Pumpkin Yeast Bread

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Recipe photo
Hands-on time:
Baking time:
Yield: 2 loaves; or 1 loaf + 12 to 16 rolls

Recipe photo

Though pumpkin is available in cans all year long, we seem to associate this bread with autumn. It makes marvelous turkey sandwiches spread with cranberry jelly and lettuce or sprouts. Because of the golden color, they also make especially festive dinner rolls for the holiday table. Make half the dough into rolls, and the other half into a loaf for sandwiches, if you like.

Pumpkin Yeast Bread

star rating (81) rate this recipe »
Hands-on time:
Baking time:
Yield: 2 loaves; or 1 loaf + 12 to 16 rolls
Published: 10/15/2014

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons instant or active dry yeast
  • 1/2 cup lukewarm milk
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 1/2 cups puréed pumpkin, either fresh or canned
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 6 1/2 cups King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom

Tips from our bakers

  • Substitute 1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice for the ground ginger and cardamom, if desired.

Directions

10/15/14: As a result of reader feedback, this recipe has been amended as follows: 1/2 cup water has been omitted; the milk has been reduced from 2/3 cup to 1/2 cup; and the salt has been increased from 2 teaspoons to 2 1/2 teaspoons. In addition, the loaf pan size has been downsized to 9" x 5" (from 10" x 5"); and the oven temperature reduced from 375°F to 350°F.

1) Place all of the ingredients into a large bowl, and mix and knead — by hand, using a mixer, or in a bread machine set on the dough cycle — to make a smooth, soft dough.

2) Put the dough into a lightly greased bowl. Cover and let it rise until doubled, about 60 to 75 minutes.

3) Gently deflate the dough, and turn it out onto a lightly oiled work surface. Divide it in half.

4) Shape each half into a loaf, and place in lightly greased 9" x 5" loaf pans. Alternatively, shape half into a loaf, and the other into 12 to 16 rolls, which can be placed into two 8" round pans, or into a 9" x 13" pan. Or, simply shape all of the dough into 24 to 32 rolls.

5) Cover the pan(s) and let the loaves/rolls rise until almost doubled, about 45 minutes. Toward the end of the rising time, preheat the oven to 350°F.

6) Bake the bread for 30 to 35 minutes, or until its crust is a deep golden brown, and a digital thermometer inserted into the center registers about 190°F. Bake the rolls for about 20 minutes, until golden brown.

7) Remove the bread from the oven, and turn it out onto a rack to cool. Store completely cool bread or rolls well-wrapped, at room temperature, for several days; freeze for longer storage.

Yield: 2 loaves; or 1 loaf and 12 to 16 rolls; or 24 to 32 rolls.

Nutrition information

Serving Size: 1 slice/roll (59g) Servings Per Batch: 26 Amount Per Serving: Calories: 150 Calories from Fat: 15 Total Fat: 2g Saturated Fat: 0g Trans Fat: 0g Cholesterol: 15mg Sodium: 230mg Total Carbohydrate: 29g Dietary Fiber: 1g Sugars: 5g Protein: 5g

* The nutrition information provided for this recipe is determined by the ESHA Genesis R&D software program. Substituting any ingredients may change the posted nutrition information.

Reviews

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  • star rating 04/10/2015
  • Heather from Chicago
  • This recipe turned out fabulously for me. It has just a slight pumpkin flavor, but not too overpowering. The bread was perfect for sandwiches.
  • star rating 01/26/2015
  • Emilia from Riegelsville Pa
  • star rating 01/10/2015
  • Noreen from Vt
  • Will not make again....never rose. Made rolls, very dense and heavy. I was looking forward to this recipe.
    Sorry to hear about this Noreen. Definitely give the hotline a call, we'll be happy to help troubleshoot.
  • star rating 12/14/2014
  • PZH from Cincinnati, OH
  • I made rolls with the dough and my family absolutely loved it
  • star rating 12/07/2014
  • jtee4short from KAF Community
  • I brought the loaves to my cousin's for Thanksgiving dinner. I tried my hand at braiding one loaf and left the other in the regular loaf shape. I put the braided loaf out with her regular white dinner rolls. Our family being pretty rigid about what's "always" served, the bread didn't go like hotcakes. They didn't know what they were missing! I had a buttered slice with my dinner and it was delicious! Next morning my cousin and I toasted some for breakfast and she really liked it! After I used some for my turkey sandwich at lunch I was hooked! And my cousin commandeered the other loaf for a Christmas bread pudding she's planning.
  • star rating 11/30/2014
  • Cathy from Tucson
  • I made this in a braid cut into rolls. Wow! The rolls were soft and yet held their shape. Perfect for both slathering with butter and for slicing for sandwiches. The presentation was lovely and the requests for adding these rolls to Christmas dinner prevailed!
  • star rating 11/20/2014
  • Creston from Pasadena, CA
  • Made this recipe the first time as written. Dough seemed too dry and didn't get as much rise in the final proofing as I would have liked so went back to my proven method. First flour should always be considered a variable in a bread recipe. The climate and other factors definitely have an affect on how much flour is needed. So I scalded the milk, added the sugar and oil then when the mixture was around 110˚ to 120˚F. I stirred in the yeast and let it set for 5 minutes to activate. I then added the pumpkin, room temperature eggs, 2 and a half cups of flour, salt and spices and mixed until just smooth. I use a stand mixer so I attached the dough hook and continued to add flour until the dough pulled away from the bowl and became smooth and elastic. I had about 1 and a half ounces of flour left from the amount called for in the recipe. I then proceeded with the remainder of the directions. Made a much smoother dough and got the final result I was expecting.
  • star rating 11/20/2014
  • Creston from Pasadena, CA
  • Made this recipe the first time as written. Dough seemed too dry and didn't get as much rise in the final proofing as I would have liked so went back to my proven method. First flour should always be considered a variable in a bread recipe. The climate and other factors definitely have an affect on how much flour is needed. So I scalded the milk, added the sugar and oil then when the mixture was around 110˚ to 120˚F. I stirred in the yeast and let it set for 5 minutes to activate. I then added the pumpkin, room temperature eggs, 2 and a half cups of flour, salt and spices and mixed until just smooth. I use a stand mixer so I attached the dough hook and continued to add flour until the dough pulled away from the bowl and became smooth and elastic. I had about 1 and a half ounces of flour left from the amount called for in the recipe. I then proceeded with the remainder of the directions. Made a much smoother dough and got the final result I was expecting.
  • star rating 11/19/2014
  • lucysmom1953 from KAF Community
  • I've made this bread several times over the last couple of years, and have had very good luck. The recipe updates are great - the dough comes together much more quickly and there's no fear of adding too much flour. Mild-tasting bread, makes wonderful toast. Lately, I've been braiding the bread and brushing with a whole egg wash before baking. The color comes out absolutely beautiful! Just for fun, I rolled out one loaf and sprinkled with cinnamon/sugar - it came out very good and my family raved about it! Excellent recipe. My only question concerns the rising. I've been using the SAF gold yeast, and find that the bread rises fine out of the oven, but there's no "pop" when it is put in the oven. I usually let it rise until it crowns about an inch over the top of the pan. The yeast was fresh out of the package (I buy in bulk and keep my yeast in the freezer). The texture of the loaf is fine, so this may be a non-issue. Any ideas? Thanks!
    We are pleased to hear you have been enjoying this recipe over the years. You are not alone as it is a popular one. Not all breads get that superb oven spring. It sounds as if you are happy with the texture so the dough consistency must be soft, smooth and somewhat sticky as it should be. We have a blog that may help you to determine if your bread has properly risen. Please go to the page on our site called blog>Tips and techniques>The bread also rises. Enjoy! Elisabeth@KAF
  • star rating 11/17/2014
  • Michele from Massachusetts
  • I halved the recipe and made it without the ginger and cardamom. I really enjoyed it and will make it again. Was good with cheese and as toast.
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