Springerle Shortbread

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Yield: 3 to 4 dozen small cookies

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If you're used to springerle cookies that are as challenging to roll out as lifting your own body weight, this recipe is your answer to sore arms! Thanks to Frank Tegethoff, one of our talented test bakers, for coming up with this easier springerle recipe.

Springerle Shortbread

star rating (8) rate this recipe »
Hands-on time:
Baking time:
Total time:
Yield: 3 to 4 dozen small cookies
Published: 09/19/2012

Ingredients

Tips from our bakers

  • For more traditionally flavored springerle, add 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon anise oil, to taste.

Directions

1) Beat together the butter, sugars, and salt until light and creamy. Beat in the egg and vanilla, and fold in the flour.

2) Divide the dough in half, shape both halves into disks, wrap in plastic, and refrigerate for at least 1 hour.

3) Preheat the oven to 400°F. Grease (or line with parchment) two baking sheets.

4) Working with one disk at a time, flour your work surface and roll the dough 1/4" thick.

5) To shape cookies using a springerle pin: Brush a very light coating of flour onto the dough and your springerle pin. Slowly roll the springerle pin over the dough, pressing down hard enough to leave a good impression. Cut the cookies apart on the lines.

6) To shape cookies using a springerle mold: Brush a very light coating of flour onto the dough and your springerle mold. Press the mold firmly into the dough, then remove and cut around the design with a knife or a fluted pastry wheel.

7) Transfer the cut cookies to the prepared baking sheets. Bake the cookies for 10 to 12 minutes, until lightly golden around the edges. Remove them from the oven, and cool right on the pan.

Yield: 3 to 4 dozen small cookies.

Reviews

1
  • star rating 12/26/2013
  • Joanna from Las Vegas
  • Love this cookie recipe! I have made Springerle cookies the traditional way and this recipe is a great way to use cookie molds without the wait. The dough is very easy to work with and holds mold patterns well. The cookies look great and taste just like a traditional shortbread.
  • star rating 12/17/2013
  • Connie Dove from Cape Neddick, ME
  • Every other year I make Springerle the "hard way" with the Hartshorn, anise, and dryout period. Ran out of energy to "do" the old-fashioned and VERY much appreciated this alternative. I did use my springerle forms and was astonished at the detail that did hold. I found that quicker cooking with convection cooking at 385 degrees worked better for me - less rise and less browning. I also added the Eggnog flavoring suggested by KAF in another shortbread and they turned out fabulous. Not as detailed as the "real" thing but far easier, tasty, and folks will still be amazed, probably believing it took more time than it actually did! Thank you AGAIN, KAF, for exploring twists on the old favorites!
  • star rating 12/15/2013
  • augiedog from KAF Community
  • Although this was an easy recipe, the result is nothing like a real springerle. They tasted like a soft shortbread cookie. The ones my Grandmother made were hard and good for dunking with definite anise flavor.
    You might consider using the Holiday Springerle (it uses anise) recipe for that more traditional springerle you remember from Grandmother. Happy Baking! Irene@KAF
  • star rating 12/08/2013
  • Jane from Tulsa, Ok
  • I really dont have a comment, but I have to ask you seasoned Springerle bakers, my family recipe calls for drying over night, and one of you said they turn out okay without doing this. Do they still puff up? Mine also have the anise seed and some lemon extract. Do any of you have those in your old recipes?
    This particular recipe does not require an overnight drying period. Our other 2 recipes on our site are more traditional and require the 24 hour drying period. This recipe bakes more like a shortbread. Please take a look at the other recipes for a tip on using anise seed (sprinkle on baking sheet before placing cut out springerle on for drying) and the other recipe uses our unique flavor, Fiori di Sicilia. You could substitute with lemon oil! Elisabeth@KAF
  • star rating 12/11/2012
  • aburdzel from KAF Community
  • Much easier and faster than traditional recipes and with a kid friendly taste. Very happy I tried it and hope we don't lose it. My kids loved painting the cookies using dusts mixed with clear vanilla. Hoping springerle will be a new tradition in our family. The cookies are beautiful. With our winter air being so dry, I wish I hadn't refrigerated it overnight even after weighing the flour as the dough became too stiff for my EDS hands. I left it out on the countertop to let it soften quite a while and then had to knead it before rolling it out but the cookies are well worth the small bit of trouble I had. I likely wouldn't double the recipe next time as it was too much for my 14 year old kitchen aid stand mixer to handle but we enjoyed all the cookies very much. So glad to find a flavor springerle that I know my kids will eat and does not require the overnight drying period.
  • star rating 12/11/2012
  • Margaret Burke from KAF Community
  • I've had a springerle pin for several years. I've never used it because the included recipe was somewhat more complicated than I wanted to deal with. Then I found this recipe, and everything changed. It's easy. It's relatively quick. And the cookies are gorgeous. Thanks much to the gentleman who came up with this!
  • star rating 11/18/2012
  • John from New Hampshire
  • This is a very easy recipe to use for several type of cookie. You can also modify it to you own taste.
  • star rating 11/14/2012
  • M Prinke from Elgin, IL
  • This came out very well and I have modified it to make different cookies as well. It came out with my mold as well as my linzer cutter. If you like a versitile recipe for standing out design this one is a winner.
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