Sweet Potato Gnocchi

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quick-n-easy
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Hands-on time:
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Yield: 4 appetizer servings

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Sweet potatoes are definitely an up and comer in the food world, and with good reason. Full of fiber and vitamins, plus incredible flavor, they're putting plain potatoes on a back burner. Our recipe for these gnocchi takes four pantry staples and turns them into a whole new dish — one that rates high on our scale of comfort foods.

Sweet Potato Gnocchi

star rating (5) rate this recipe »
quick-n-easy
Hands-on time:
Total time:
Yield: 4 appetizer servings
Published: 03/02/2014

Ingredients

Directions

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1) Place baked sweet potatoes on a flat surface and slice to expose the interior. Scoop out the potato, being careful not to get large pieces of skin mixed in. A muffin scoop can be a great tool for scooping.

2) Place the potato flesh into a potato ricer with the large hole screen and press through. If you don't have a potato ricer, use a potato masher or fork. Keep in mind you want the potato to be light and fluffy, as opposed to mashed.

3) Cool the potato to lukewarm. Add the egg, mixing until well combined.

4) With your fingers or a fork, gently work the freshly grated Parmesan cheese into the potato mixture. Use a light touch to keep the mixture from becoming too dense.

5) Sprinkle most of the flour over the mixture. Work it in with your fingers or a fork. You're looking to make a soft dough that just holds together. It's OK if there's flour still left in the bowl; you don't want to knead the dough thoroughly.

6) Cover the gnocchi dough with plastic wrap and allow it to rest while you bring 2 quarts of water to a rolling boil. On another burner, melt 2 tablespoons butter in a large skillet. You'll need both the water and skillet ready to go when you start cooking the gnocchi, as they cook in just a few minutes.

7) When the water is nearly boiling, use a baker?s bench knife to divide the dough into three tennis ball-sized pieces. Divide those pieces into smaller pieces, about the size of your index finger and about 1" long.

8) Gently roll each gnocchi in flour to prevent sticking. Using a gnocchi board or fork, press grooves into each piece nd set it aside as you roll more pieces. Not sure how to use a gnocchi board? Head on over to our blog to check out the step-by-step photos.

9) Place the gnocchi into the boiling water and stir gently. They'll sink at first, and after a few minutes will begin to float. Once all of the gnocchi are floating, cook for 1 to 2 minutes.

10) Making sure the skillet is hot, use a slotted spoon or strainer to scoop up the gnocchi and place them in the hot butter. Fry until they turn golden brown on one side, then flip and cook for another minute or two. Serve hot with small pieces of feta, smoked mozzarella, or Gorgonzola cheese as topping; or with your favorite sauce.

Yield: 4 appetizer servings.

Nutrition information

Serving Size: 1/4 recipe (142g) Servings Per Batch: 4 Amount Per Serving: Calories: 270 Calories from Fat: 90 Total Fat: 10g Saturated Fat: 6g Trans Fat: 0g Cholesterol: 70mg Sodium: 200mg Total Carbohydrate: 36g Dietary Fiber: 4g Sugars: 6g Protein: 10g

* The nutrition information provided for this recipe is determined by the ESHA Genesis R&D software program. Substituting any ingredients may change the posted nutrition information.

Reviews

1
  • star rating 03/17/2015
  • Karen from Central New Jersey
  • these were really great, although I couldn't get the fork indents to work well so I just made them plain. My dough was REALLY soft and I was afraid to add too much flour...can you tell me by measurement about how much sweet potato you scooped into the ricer...I think I purchase larger potatoes , thus the really soft dough . I think on summer vacation in VT I'll stop in and get that little grooved board because I definitely will keep making these till I get it right !!!!
  • star rating 07/21/2014
  • Miriam from KAF Community
  • I loved the tenderness and flavor as did my kiddo. I grated some parmesan on top because it's what I had. It was a smidge plain, but the kiddo really didn't want to save the last 2 for grandma to taste. It was quite the sticky dough, definitely needed a light touch and bit of flour at the last minute to allow it to be rolled out on the gnocchi board. I would have made a frustrating mess if I'd tried to do the shaping on the back of a fork. The trip into town to a fancy store and the $10 I spent on a gnocchi board seemed so frivolous, but now I love to make them & my kiddo can do the shaping. This was a lovely treat that I'll happily make again. Because it's a much smaller batch and I had to make them big it was actually easier & faster to make than your regular gnocchi - I make the kind you pair with pesto parsley although I put whatever I have with it. Thank you for this and SO many fabulous recipes!
  • star rating 05/31/2014
  • enjhagen from KAF Community
  • Easy to make and delicious. I used white whole wheat flour and sprinkled with a little salt at the end since I use unsalted butter. It will take a little practice, but the gnocchi board is a plus.
  • star rating 05/17/2014
  • Roxann from Nebraska
  • I have now made this recipe two times, and both times I had trouble with the consistency of the dough. I added a whole cup of flour, and the dough was still so sticky that it could not be rolled out. Perhaps my definition of "medium" sweet potato is different from KAF? Despite the difficulties with consistency (and therefore shape), the gnocchi still turned out quite delicious and everyone enjoyed them. So I still will make the recipe again - just wish I could get them to turn out smooth and beautiful, rather than sticky little dumplings.
  • star rating 03/20/2014
  • erinhibshman from KAF Community
  • This was an interesting recipe. I had never made gnocchi before, but wanted to give it a try after reading the enticing blog post! It was definitely easy to come together, but I would have appreciated a range of weight for the sweet potatoes (my medium size may not be the same as someone else's, and it is easy to weigh out 1 or 2 or 3 potatoes). That being said, my potatoes must have been on the large side because I needed to add a bit more flour to get a sticky dough. Even then it probably could have used a bit more to make it able to be formed into logs without sliding apart. The taste was do delicious, and I see myself making this again for a special treat!
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