Vermont Whole Wheat Oatmeal Honey Bread

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whole grain
Recipe photo
Hands-on time:
Baking time:
Total time:
Yield: 2 loaves

Recipe photo

This is a lovely, soft, mildly sweet loaf, perfect for both sandwiches and toast.

Vermont Whole Wheat Oatmeal Honey Bread

star rating (208) rate this recipe »
whole grain
Hands-on time:
Baking time:
Total time:
Yield: 2 loaves
Published: 10/04/2013

Ingredients

Tips from our bakers

  • While maple sugar gives this bread an extra hint of flavor, we realize it's expensive; feel free to substitute brown sugar.

Directions

see this recipe's blog »

1) In a large mixing bowl, combine the water, oats, maple or brown sugar, honey, butter, salt, and cinnamon. Let cool to lukewarm, about 10 to 15 minutes.

2) Add the yeast and flours, stirring to form a rough dough. Knead (about 10 minutes by hand, 5 to 7 minutes by machine) until the dough is smooth and satiny.

3) Transfer the dough to a lightly greased bowl, cover the bowl with lightly greased plastic wrap, and allow the dough to rise for 1 hour. Since the dough is warm to begin with (from the boiling water), it should become quite puffy.

4) Divide the dough in half, and shape each half into a loaf. Place the loaves in two greased 8 1/2" x 4 1/2" bread pans.

5) Cover the pans with lightly greased plastic wrap and allow the loaves to rise until they've crowned about 1" over the rim of the pan, about 60 to 90 minutes.

6) Bake the loaves in a preheated 350°F oven for 35 to 40 minutes, tenting them lightly with aluminum foil after 25 minutes, to prevent over-browning. Remove them from the oven when they're golden brown, and the interior registers 190°F on a digital thermometer.

7) Turn the loaves out onto a rack to cool. Store at room temperature, well-wrapped, for several days; freeze for longer storage.

Yield: 2 sandwich loaves.

Nutrition information

Serving Size: 1 slice Servings Per Batch: 16 per loaf Amount Per Serving: Calories: 110 Calories from Fat: 15 Total Fat: 2g Saturated Fat: 1g Trans Fat: 0g Cholesterol: 5mg Sodium: 180mg Total Carbohydrate: 20g Dietary Fiber: 1g Sugars: 4g Protein: 3g

* The nutrition information provided for this recipe is determined by the ESHA Genesis R&D software program. Substituting any ingredients may change the posted nutrition information.

Reviews

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  • star rating 04/26/2015
  • robyn from baton rouge, LA
  • I don't make a lot of bread but this was soooo easy and restaurant quality! my family couldn't stop eating it!
  • star rating 04/02/2015
  • Kris from Fond du Lac WI
  • Making this bread for the second time. Absolutely awesome! Used my bread machine to do the kneading. Baked it in loaf pans.
  • star rating 04/02/2015
  • Kris from Fond du Lac WI
  • Making this bread for the second time. Absolutely awesome! Used my bread machine to do the kneading. Baked it in loaf pans.
  • star rating 03/29/2015
  • kim from maine
  • Yum! Have made this for the last two weeks and no leftovers. Smells great when baking. I just mix it up in the kitchen aid, have to stop now and then to push the dough into the bowl as it creeps up the hook since it is a larger batch than I usually do. I did use maple syrup for the brown sugar as I had no sugar the first time and it was not a problem.
  • star rating 03/15/2015
  • grace from mountain lake
  • Made this yesterday. Good bread, will make it again but next time I will cut down the cinnamon.
  • star rating 03/11/2015
  • 1vnarciso from KAF Community
  • Just made this in my De'Longhi bread machine. First I the cut recipe in half as I had read in prior comments. I also called the KAF help line a couple of times :-) Came out beautifully browned with a nice high rise, fine soft texture and great taste! I soaked the ingredients in a bowl for at least 20 minutes before putting them in the machine. Substituted bread flour for all purpose and used white whole wheat with a little higher ratio of WWW to white flour than recipe but still to recipe weight. Did not have maple sugar so used brown sugar and did not add the cinnamon. I set the machine for a one pound basic white loaf with medium crust. Wound up adding a couple of extra tablespoons of flour as dough was still a little too tacky. I always remove the paddle before the last rise, shape and butter the dough and place back in pan, also butter the post in the pan to prevent sticking. Thinking I might try increasing the oats and just a little less sugar. I had wanted to make this for a long time but was not sure about using the bread machine, so happy I finally tried it. I make bread every week and the machine does such a great job I haven't made bread by hand for the last couple of years. Will be making this often! I buttered the top just like the photos. Wish I could add a photo!
  • star rating 03/06/2015
  • gen6tex from KAF Community
  • I broke my rule regarding following a new recipe exactly the first time and substituted a cup of my starter for a scant cup of flour and a half cup of water. I didn't reduce the yeast to be sure it rose. The results were fantastic. Both rises were accomplished in a little under an hour despite my cold house. I used brown sugar and measured it like flour, fluff, spoon lightly, level, and it is not too sweet. I will try this again when it gets warmer and reduce or omit the yeast.
  • star rating 03/05/2015
  • Renate from Long Beach
  • The taste is lovely, but it didn't rise as much as I anticipated it to. It definitely was not "fluffy" in its final form. I followed the directions exactly, with the exception of adding 2 tablespoons of vital wheat gluten (also from KAF) and I proofed in a proofing box at 99 degrees. My mixer had a really hard time with the dough (which is how I usually knead) so I switched to kneading by hand but still didn't get a very elastic dough or a high rise even with the vital wheat gluten or the proofing box. I'm not sure what went wrong.

    Renate, it sounds like you may have used too much flour, which can produce a bread that is stiff and hard to manipulate as well a loaf that doesn't rise quite as much as you would have hoped. We base our recipes on one cup of flour weighing 4 1/4 ounces and if you simply dip your measuring cup into the flour and level it with a knife, you can get up to 5 ounces of flour per cup. We recommend stirring your flour to aerate it first, and then gently spooning the flour into your measuring cup to get a nice, light and fluffy cup of flour. This should help your bread immensely. If you have any further questions, feel free to call the Baker's Hotline at 855-371-2253. Good luck and happy baking! --Kye@KAF

  • star rating 03/03/2015
  • Tammyvt from KAF Community
  • love the rise this bread has. I didn't have whole wheat flour, and I only used 5 cups of white flour... I think a little less flour works better for this recipe. Also, I didn't let step 1 cool too much before I added the yeast. Then I let step one mixture sit until really bubbly..about 20 min total.. I love this recipe.
    We're thrilled you love this bread as much as most of the Vermonters here do! One word of caution--yeast begins to die at 130 degrees, so if you add the yeast to the boiling water you risk having a flat, unleaved bread. Be sure to allow it to cool at least to 120 degrees. Happy baking! --Kye@KAF
  • star rating 03/01/2015
  • Cakemaven from KAF Community
  • Made this recipe today - didn't need 2 loaves, so I cut the recipe in half and it came out perfect. Substituted 1 Tbsp of lecithin for 1 Tbsp of the butter and ended up with a soft, light yummy loaf! Made it in my bread machine on the dough cycle, then baked it as the recipe suggested. It only took 18 minutes for 1 loaf at 350 degrees to hit 190 internal temperature. My only change for next time will be to cut the sugar in half - it tasted more like a sweet bread than a sandwich bread.
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