Me: “Sue, what are you doing?”

Sue: “I'm making a Hawaiian pizza.”

Me: “Oooh, oooh, wait a sec. Stop. I need to blog this."

Sue, whose hands have graced many a catalogue photo in her many years here at King Arthur, obediently stops spreading tomato sauce on a pizza crust, mid-stroke. I grab my camera, snap the picture, and she continues topping the pizza.

“Wait, wait - is that sautéed pineapple? And ham?”

Sue sees where I'm going. “Want me to dump ’em back in the frying pan so you can take their picture?”

Sheepishly, I nod. Together, we photograph Hawaiian pizza backwards – to the crust. At that point, there's no undoing a risen bowl of dough.

So Sue hands me the recipe and I start again, making pizza dough from scratch.

img_6941.JPG

It's a recipe I haven't tried before, using an ingredient I love, but seldom remember to use: Hi-maize fiber.

Are you lukewarm about whole wheat, but would still love to add fiber to your diet? Hi-maize is your dream ingredient. Best of all, it's completely “invisible.” Use Hi-maize in this crust, and no one will know they're eating a high-fiber pizza, I guarantee it.

img_2884.JPG

For an ultra-chewy crust, try our highest gluten flour: Sir Lancelot.

img_6536.JPG

Put the following in a bowl:

3 cups Sir Lancelot High-Gluten Flour*
3/4 cup Hi-maize Fiber*
1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon Pizza Dough Flavor, optional but tasty
1 teaspoon instant yeast
1 1/4 teaspoons salt
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 1/2 cups lukewarm water, enough to make a soft, smooth dough

img_6537.JPG

Mix till cohesive...

img_6538.JPG

...then knead to make a soft, smooth dough.

img_6539.JPG

Put the dough in a lightly greased bowl or large measuring cup; an 8-cup measure allows you to track just how much the dough has risen.

img_6540.JPG

Let it rise for an hour; it'll expand quite a bit, though it won't double in size.

You can use the dough immediately, if you like. But I prefer to let it chill and develop its flavor. Refrigerate overnight, tightly covered, or for up to 24 hours.

img_6544.JPG

The dough will continue to rise as it chills. (No kidding – look at it!)

And, as I mentioned, it'll develop wonderful flavor, thanks to the organic acids released by the growing yeast.

When you're ready to make pizza, remove the dough from the refrigerator, and divide it in half.

Lightly grease two 12” or 14” round pizza pans; or a couple of baking sheets; or a couple of pieces of parchment (if you're going to bake on a pizza stone).

If you're using pans, drizzle olive oil into the bottom; this will make the bottom of the crust crunchy and super-tasty.

img_6549.JPG

Shape each piece of dough into a 10" to 14" disk (thick crust vs. thin crust), and place in the prepared pans.

I'm doing an experiment here: 14” pan on the left, 12” pan on the right. How thick will each crust wind up being?

You won't be able to press the dough all the way to the edge of the pan at once. It'll keep wanting to shrink back to its original size; that's the gluten at work. Simply walk away for 15 minutes, come back...

img_6551.JPG

...and press some more. Wait 15 minutes...

img_6556.JPG

...and press some more.

Trust me, this takes longer, but it's MUCH easier than trying to beat your stubborn, rubber-band crust into submission!

img_6575.JPG

Cover with lightly greased plastic wrap, and let the crusts rise for 1 to 2 hours, till they're as puffy as you like.

While the crusts are rising, prepare your fillings.

img_6407.JPG

We'll start with the Hawaiian filling. Lightly grease a frying pan or skillet, and sauté pineapple till lightly browned. How much? One fresh pineapple, peeled, cored and cut into chunks; or two 20-ounce cans of pineapple chunks, well drained. Either way, you need 4 to 5 cups of pineapple chunks.

While sautéeing isn't strictly necessary, it intensifies the flavors, and helps keep the pizza from getting soggy from pineapple juice.

img_6408.JPG

Remove the pineapple, and sauté 1 pound of thick-sliced ham, cut into squares.

img_6410.JPG

Spread each crust with as much pizza sauce as you like; Sue uses about 1 cup for a 14” pizza.

img_6412.JPG

Top with the ham...

img_6413.JPG

...distributing it evenly.

img_6416.JPG

Press the pineapple chunks on top.

img_6418.JPG

Sprinkle each pizza with 1 to 2 cups (4 to 8 ounces) shredded cheese; mozzarella, or your favorite combination.

img_6419.JPG

At last! Ready to hit the oven.

img_6420.JPG

Bake for about 25 minutes, until the crusts are brown and the cheese is melted and bubbly.

img_6424.JPG

Lovely! Do you feel a luau coming on?

img_6564.JPG

Slice and serve, to a suitably appreciative audience.

I prefer to bake my crusts before topping. I think they have better texture, and the toppings have less tendency to get hard or burned, too.

So let's hark back to our risen-and-ready crusts.

img_6577.JPG

Bake the untopped crusts in a preheated 425°F oven for 12 minutes.

img_6582.JPG

Take the hot crusts out of the oven. Top one with pineapple and ham; pizza sauce is optional.

img_6579.JPG

Top the other with garlic and onions.

Here I've taken half a head of peeled garlic cloves, and whirled them in the food processor with 2 teaspoons of Pizza Seasoning and 1/4 cup olive oil.

img_6580.JPG

This is one very large sweet onion. I cut it in chunks, and sautéed the chunks slowly, in olive oil, till softened and browned.

I brush the baked crust with the garlic/olive oil, then layer the onions on top.

img_6612.JPG

Next up: cheese.

I open the fridge. Bars of Cabot cheese fill the vegetable bin. Ah, reduced fat cheddar... nah, not today.

I choose Habanero for the garlic/onion pizza, Pepper Jack for the Hawaiian.

img_6567.JPG

“Hot Habanero,” the label says. Habanero, Jalapeño, Pepper Jack... whatever, I think. A bit of heat goes well with any pizza topping.

I've tried many Cabot cheeses, but not Hot Habanero.

I pop a chunk in my mouth.

Now, one would think the modifier “hot” would have clued me in to the fact that this cheese is more than simply spicy.

It's HOT.

dscn0009.jpg

WOW.

Susan happened to be holding her camera, and snapped a picture of my Scoville Scale blush. I'd just managed to smile (barely), after about 30 seconds of watering eyes, burning mouth, and speechless hand-flapping.

ZOWIE. Hot Habanero is right.

img_6583.JPG

Anyway, back to the Hawaiian Pizza.

img_6584.JPG

And the Not-Hawaiian (Onion-Garlic-Habanero) Pizza.

img_6586.JPG

Into the 425°F oven they go, for 12 minutes or so, till the cheese is melted, but not rubbery or hard.

img_6588.JPG

On the left, Pepper Jack Hawaiian. On the right, the Deadly Habanero Onion-Garlic.

GREATLY enjoyed, later that evening, by my asbestos-tongue, iron-stomach husband.

img_6603.JPG

Back to that crust experiment. What's the difference between a 14” thinner crust pizza, and 12” thicker-crust? About 1/2” in height.

img_6592.JPG

Dig in!

Read, rate, and review (please) our recipe for Hawaiian Pizza.

Tagged:
Filed Under: Recipes
PJ Hamel
The Author

About PJ Hamel

PJ Hamel grew up in New England, graduated from Brown University, and was a Maine journalist before joining King Arthur Flour in 1990. PJ bakes and writes from her home on Cape Cod, where she enjoys beach-walking, her husband, two dogs, and really good food!