Hamburger or Hot Dog Buns

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Hamburger or Hot Dog Buns

star rating (48) rate this recipe »
Published prior to 2008

Summer is the time of year when everyone thinks about grilling outdoors. Homemade buns make hamburgers and hot dogs taste out of this world. If you live in an area where the temperature gets so hot you don't want to heat up your oven, make a bunch of buns early in the season and freeze them. To give them a heartier texture, you can substitute 2 cups of King Arthur Traditional Whole Wheat Flour for an equal amount of King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour.

2 tablespoons granulated sugar
2 packets or 2 scant tablespoons active dry yeast
1/2 cup warm water (105°F to 115°F)
2 cups warm milk (105°F to 115°F)
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 teaspoons salt
6 to 7 1/2 cups King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour*
egg wash: 1 egg beaten with 1 tablespoon cold water
sesame, poppy or caraway seeds or coarse salt (optional)

*We give you this fairly wide variation for a couple of reasons. First, you'll find in the summer that you'll need a bit more flour to absorb a given amount of liquid than you will in the winter. This is because it's humid and flour acts somewhat like a slightly dampened sponge as a result.

Second, this particular dough should be quite slack, i.e., very relaxed in order to make soft and tender buns. So you want to add only enough more flour, past the 6-cup point, to make the dough just kneadable; sprinkling only enough more to keep it from sticking to you or the board.

Mixing: In a large bowl, dissolve the sugar and then the yeast in the warm water. Add the milk, oil, salt and 3 cups of flour to the yeast mixture. Beat vigorously for 2 minutes.

Gradually add flour, 1/4 cup at a time, until the dough begins to pull away from the sides of the bowl. Turn the dough out onto a floured work surface.

Kneading: Knead until you have a smooth, elastic dough. Because this dough is so slack, you may find that a bowl scraper or bench knife can be helpful in scooping up the dough and folding it over on itself.

Rising: Put the dough into an oiled bowl. Turn once to coat the entire ball of dough with oil. Cover with a tightly-woven dampened towel and let rise until doubled, about one hour.

Shaping: Turn the dough out onto a lightly oiled work surface. Divide into 18 equal pieces. This is done most easily by dividing the dough first into thirds, then those thirds into halves, then the halves into thirds.

Shape each piece into a ball. For hamburger buns, flatten the balls into 3 1/2-inch disks. For hot-dog buns, roll the balls into cylinders, 4 1/2-inches in length. Flatten the cylinders slightly; dough rises more in the center so this will give a gently rounded top versus a high top.

For soft-sided buns, place them on a well-seasoned baking sheet a half inch apart so they'll grow together when they rise. For crisper buns, place them three inches apart.

Second Rising: Cover with a towel and let rise until almost doubled, about 45 minutes.

Baking: Fifteen minutes before you want to bake your buns, preheat your oven to 400°F. Just before baking, lightly brush the tops of the buns with the egg wash and sprinkle with whatever seeds strike your fancy.

Bake for 20 minutes or until the internal temperature of the bread reaches 190°F. (A dough thermometer takes the guesswork out of this.)

When the buns are done, remove them from the baking sheet to cool on a wire rack. This will prevent the crust from becoming soggy.

Nutrition information per serving (1 bun, 93 g): 206 cal, 3 g fat, 7 g protein, 37 g complex carbohydrates, 1 g sugar, 1 g dietary fiber, 17 mg cholesterol, 255 mg sodium, 119 mg potassium, 2 mg iron, 120 mg calcium, 83 mg phosphorus.

This recipe reprinted from The Baking Sheet Newsletter, Vol. III, No. 5, May-June 1992 issue.

Reviews

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  • star rating 04/22/2015
  • from OK
  • Made a nice roll for sausage and onions. Kids loved it
  • star rating 01/10/2015
  • Eddy from Perth Australia
  • Wish you would use scales please
    Hi there. You'll find all recipes posted on the site after 2008 will have weight measures included, in ounces and grams as well. Our older recipes are slowing being converted as well, thanks for your patience as we work our way through the archives. ~ MJ
  • star rating 11/21/2014
  • Ann from Washington State
  • Excellent!! Just made as hot dog buns.....they taste like they would be good as any roll. I might try to make the buns a little smaller next time. Easy and yummy! Thanks KAF!!!
  • star rating 09/17/2014
  • Claire from Seguin, TX
  • Just ate one of these amazing buns!!! I followed the recipe exactly and they turned out great. We had just bought some 100% slow smoked beef dogs and put them on this bun and my husband said..."The best dog I've ever eaten!" That says something in that he's pretty picky. I love the airy center and the semi crisp outside... Perfect for loading up with all the toppings. I actually ate one of the buns separate before I served them with the hot dogs. They were just as good stand alone. I will be using this again for sure!
  • star rating 09/17/2014
  • Claire from Seguin, TX
  • Just ate one of these amazing buns!!! I followed the recipe exactly and they turned out great. We had just bought some 100% slow smoked beef dogs and put them on this bun and my husband said..."The best dog I've ever eaten!" That says something in that he's pretty picky. I love the airy center and the semi crisp outside... Perfect for loading up with all the toppings. I actually ate one of the buns separate before I served them with the hot dogs. They were just as good stand alone. I will be using this again for sure!
  • star rating 09/14/2014
  • tracy from Holland, mi
  • I followed the recipe exactly, and I don't live at a high elevation or have any humidity concerns. They came out flat as flat bread and hard as rocks. :-(
    Oh, no Tracy! It may be shaping was the culprit. If you had a soft and supple dough, the buns should still hold their shape. It may be a good opportunity to call our baker's hotline (855-371-2253) to get more advice and we can determine together what to do for recipe success - we'll ask questions about mixing method, rise location, and shaping to get you to the next level! Looking forward to your call - Irene@KAF
  • star rating 07/29/2014
  • from
  • star rating 07/11/2014
  • BonneH from Graham, WA
  • Quite good....I used white whole wheat flour for about 2/3 of the flour called for in the recipe which made a slightly stiffer dough, but the results were delicious, soft and tender. Made a great burger.
  • 02/07/2014
  • Suzie from NS Canada
  • Can't be sure what the complaints are about, but they really did keeep me from trying it until today. I just couldn't stomach the idea of another Wonderbread Hot Dog roll. UGH. I was prepared to accept initial failure based on those comments I read, "flat"," tasteless", "failed second rising", "no flavor", " won't rise at all" So, figuring "Well, the recipie is made in one place in the US, people from all over the world are trying it verbatim... and half expecting identical results, despite vastly different altitudes, weather, temperature, relative humidities, barometric pressures, etc... etc.. ad nauseum." How can they possibly receieve identical results. Some mods are required based on location etc. Makes sense So, I'll try it, and watch the results carefully. And tweak here and there till the third or fourth attempt nets me a recipie I'm happy enough with to never eat store bought hot dog or hamburger buns ever again. I started by following the exact recipie as stated...PAYING ATTENTION TO DETAILS. Maybe because the pressure was off me... I mean I was EXPECTING to feed the first batch to the chickens.... guess what? I must live at the same altitude as the KAF test kitchen. They turned out p-e-r-f-e-c-t! Light, fluffy, delicious. Picture perfect. My pan held only 16 buns, so even the size of each was perfect. Everyone loved the buns. I can't see why I'd ever want/need another recipie for Hot Dog buns or Hamburger buns. If it ain't broke don't fix it. I'm no baker... I've only ever baked a handful of items before with mixed results....... these buns are the best thing I've made. The KAF flour really makes a difference. So, if you are reading this, don't let the naysayers hold you back...get some KAF flour, yeast pans if you dont have em, and TRY IT!. Worst case scenario, to make em a couple or 3 times to get it right for your location. Best case scenario the kids say MOM, these buns are the bomb. All I can say is...it worked for me. Thanks for the recipie.
  • star rating 12/31/2013
  • cainch from KAF Community
  • Dependable recipe. I've used it for both burger and brat buns numerous times with nary a misfire. Haven't needed to change a thing.
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