Beat the back to school blues with Breakfast Cookies

breakfast-cookies

“Mom, can I have cookies for breakfast?”

I know we’ve all heard it at some point in time getting the kids ready for school, or (insert early morning sport) practice, or even just on a lazy Sunday morning when they think they can catch you off guard. Well, how’d you like to be able to say  “Yes?”  Wouldn’t that just beat all, and leave your offspring thinking you’ve finally gone over the edge? Not really…

But it sure would be funny to see their expressions! These days many of us are up and on the go early, and full breakfasts just aren’t always part of the plan.

We know the deep-down truth about fast food even if it tastes good, and even many “healthy” granola bars on the market are loaded with artificial colors and unpronounceable ingredients. Not all, mind you. There are some great ones out there to serve to your family without a hint of guilt, but wouldn’t it be nice to whip up something delicious and be able to add just what YOU want for ingredients?

I’ve been making these Breakfast Cookies for nearly 20 years now. I’ve tweaked the original recipe many times over, quite a few since coming to work here at King Arthur. The greatest thing I’ve found about this recipe (besides sharing it with many, many parents of my students over the years) is that it’s very adaptable, and each person can really tailor it to their tastes. Don’t like coconut? Leave it out. Love walnuts? Throw ‘em in! To quote the famous jingle, “Have it your way!”

Just a quick note before you break out the rope to string me up. These are still cookies, and I’m certainly not advocating them for breakfast every day of the year. BUT, these cookies can be loaded with fiber and protein and can be part of a balanced breakfast in moderation. Fair ’nuff?

I’m pretty darn happy with this latest variation, so let’s get started on our Breakfast Cookies.

Place the butter, sugar, and peanut butter in the bowl of your stand mixer.

Blend on medium speed until lightened and fluffy.

Add the eggs and mix until well incorporated.

In a separate bowl mix together the Hi-maize flour, dried milk and your assorted add-ins and the cinnamon. I chose rolled oats, barley flakes, coconut, and chocolate chips. It looks like a lot of chocolate here, but there IS healthy stuff under it.

After I took the picture I found my cup full of coconut on the counter. I really did use it, you just can’t see it in the photo.

Combine the King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour with the peanut butter mixture. Have I told you lately how much I love this flour?

I like knowing that the flour isn’t bleached and that we don’t add bromates, either. I love the fineness of the grind, too. Sometimes you’ll catch me running my fingers through the flour, making little mounds and rivers, just for the feel of it – smooth as silk.

After the flour is incorporated add your heapin’ helpin’ of mix-ins. The dough will get much thicker, but shouldn’t dry out and get clumpy.

Use a generous 1/4 cup measure to scoop out the dough onto parchment- lined cookie sheets. These cookies don’t spread much, so you can place them fairly close together.

Somehow I missed the photo of the unbaked cookies on the sheet, but this should give you a good idea of spacing. If you like mounded cookies, don’t press the dough down. If you like flatter cookies like these, press the dough down gently with your fingers.

Bake at 350°F for 18 to 22 minutes, until lightly browned. Over-baking these cookies will dry them out, so try a test cookie or two to get the feel for them in your oven.

Ah, breakfast is ready! Give me two of these cookies, a piece of fruit and a glass of juice and I’m set for hours.

OK, you can start cussin’ me out now, because I’m going to show you something we don’t have in stock yet. Cruel, cruel woman!

These sweet little bits ARE going to be available from us this coming holiday season, but I was so excited about them I just had to show them to you now.

They’re little bits of jam to add to your baking. These are raspberry, but we’ll have blueberry, too. Just stir them into your batter like chips or nuts, and they bake into melty little pools of jam-y goodness.

You can see how the bits that touched the parchment melted and the ones inside the cookie stayed whole. You can also see the coconut in this finished cookie.  Ummm, are you hungry, too? I sure could go for one right now.

So whether you’re headed back to school or back to work or even out to play for the weekend, why not start the day with these hearty Breakfast Cookies? Your taste buds, tummy, and (of course) your kids will thank you.

Please bake, rate, and review our recipe for Breakfast Cookies.

MaryJane Robbins
About

MaryJane Robbins grew up in Massachusetts and moved to Vermont 20 years ago. After teaching young children for 15 years, she changed careers and joined King Arthur Flour in 2005. MaryJane began working on King Arthur Flour's baker’s hotline in 2006, and the blog team ...

comments

  1. Wei-Wei

    The breakfast cookies I make involve raisins, walnuts and a whole lotta oats! But these are awesomer, because they contain butter and sugar and chocolate chips. And jam. Awesome.
    HI Wei-Wei,
    I’ve made these cookies with raisins and nuts and oats too. Nice and filling, and good for afterschool too. ~ MaryJane

    Reply
  2. Kristen

    I make breakfast cookies most often for car trips. They are filling, not messy and the whole “eat a cookie for breakfast” thing quiets kids that might not appreciate getting up at 4am to start a long trip. My recipe has rice crispies and raisins in them as well as the oatmeal. I have a few that don’t appreciate chocolate like they should, but substituting butterscotch chips would satisfy all of my kids’ palates.

    Those jam bites open up an entire World of possibilities. I can’t wait to see what you come up with!!
    Oh yeah, Andrea has been hard at work putting the Jammy Bits into everything from cookies to muffins in lots of different versions. Stay tuned! ~ MaryJane

    Reply
  3. jlm10794

    oh my goodness–give me BOTH kinds of those jammie thingies–whoa, my mouth is absolutely watering!!! So when are they coming?? Ummmm, I can see those in a scone, or in muffins, or like you did in cookies–wow the possibilities are endless!!!
    I like that, jammie thingies. They will be available for the holiday season! Elisabeth @ KAF

    Reply
  4. Jessie @ simplysifted

    I’m eating a cookie for breakfast as I read this! It’s not a wholesome cookie though – just a plain old chocolate chip cookie.

    I can’t wait until the jam bits are available. They sound amazing! I bet they’ll be awesome in pound cake.
    They were awesome in a fruit cake made with chocolate chips and rum soaked raisins and in oatmeal cookies! A real added twist and coming soon! Elisabeth @ KAF

    Reply
  5. Clare

    I am desperate to have you convert this for us Gluten-free eaters. I’m sure I can substitute your GFAPF, but the Hi-Maize? Should I use quinoa? Peanut flour?

    I need the structure of a recipe, because things just don’t turn out when I experiment. :) Any help is appreciated.

    Looks delicious, so get those GF bakers working. The High Maize that we are offering now is gluten-free and packaged in a gluten-free facility. What we offered before is gluten-free ingredient-wise, but was packaged in a gluten facility without dedicated lines. I hope this information helps. Mary@ KAF

    Reply
  6. BNLeuck

    1 1/4 c seems like a lot of sugar… do you think I could cut that in half without much difficulty? And what about subbing some of the sugar out for something like honey or agave?

    Also: thank you for choosing to offer raspberry and blueberry jammie thingies (I like that phrase too!) instead of strawberry! It seems EVERYTHING is strawberry these days, and I miss the other berries!
    Hey there,
    You can probably cut the sugar back, try starting with 3/4 cup. Keep an eye on the dough, if it starts to look dry, add milk to keep it from getting crumbly. Let us know how it goes. ~ MaryJane

    Reply
  7. Cyn

    Oh, you had me at jammy bites! Can’t wait for their availability. I’m already thinking of the possibilities — wonder how they would taste mixed in with shortbread cookie dough? Excellent idea-I think these will be great in shortbread-we will have to try. JMD@KAF

    Andrea made a shortbread type cookie with the blueberry bits and lemon and it was totally sweet, crunchy, sandy and berry goodness. She’s totally rockin’ the Jammy Bits. ~ MaryJane

    Reply
  8. lishy

    Wow yummy! These, even though they are cookies, seem much healthier than many breakfast recipes I have seen. I can imagine them being pretty good with whole wheat flour. My kids love any kind of fruit in their cookies! We did whole wheat orange with dried mangoes and white chocolate chips and coconut, yummy!
    Sounds great. I have a harder time eating whole wheat, but the very very very original recipe I saw for this used half whole wheat, so go for it! ~ MaryJane

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  9. awalt

    I would love to make these today but have no high-maize flour. Can you provide me a substitute until I can make a purchase?
    You could use ground oats, or even just whole wheat flour until you get the HI-Maize. It would work just fine.
    ~ MaryJane

    Reply
  10. Becky

    As my daughter gets ready to head to kindergarten this year, I’ve been trying to think of yummy, sort of healthy, treats for her lunchbox and I think these would make a great lunch box treat too! Thanks for the great recipes. King Arthur is the first place I look when I need a recipe :)
    With cookies for lunch, your little girl is going to be the envy of the classroom! ~ MaryJane

    Reply
  11. Fran S

    I don’t recall having to sign in before, I am registered but do not have a clue what my password is.
    At any rate, I saw a recipe once for breakfast cookies that had a jar of babyfood carrots in the batter for added nutritional boost. I never did try to make them. These I will try, what a great way to use up odds and ends like leftover 1/2 cups of chocolate chips or nuts you may have laying around.
    I think you should send a special e-mail to all the loyal bloggers when those jam bites become available. Awsome. I wonder how they’d be in doughnut holes? My creative juices are flowing…
    Never fear, I’m sure we’ll post here and on the community site, Facebook etc. when the Jammy Bits arrive. How about National KAF Jammy Bits Day? We can all stay home and bake with Jammy Bits while in our jammies!
    ~ MaryJane

    Reply
  12. Jane

    Could you use the jammie things in thumbprint cookies? It could be an easier way to fill the little thumbprint. They wouldn’t melt as smooth as jelly. They would probably work though and would give a bit of texture. Mary@KAF

    Reply
  13. ngastineau2002

    Oh Boy! School starts here in NC next Wednesday. I think I will be baking up a batch of these for my girls. They will love them, we all will! My girls and I are not into traditional breakfast items like cereal or eggs, usually opting for something like a tuna sandwich or leftovers from dinner, but these would really be an excellent alternative. I also cannot wait to get me some of those jam bits, what an awesome idea! My brain is working now trying to decide what to put them in first!
    Yes, school for my teen starts next Weds. too. She’s both excited and not, but very happy not to have any Math classes first semester. Back to school shopping was a treat today, and now we are home to color her hair purple. Looks like we’re off to another great year! Hope your kiddos have fun! ~ MaryJane

    Reply
  14. Kelly

    Those jam bites look amazing! I can’t wait to try them. I’ve been looking up recipes to try on my picky eater while he’s at school, so this one will have to be tried, too!
    HI Kelly,
    You might want to check out bento and bento boxes. Little attractive bits of this and that arranged in small boxes really can help picky eaters choose what they want and small amounts aren’t overwhelming. I like justbento.com and lunchinabox.net. ~ MaryJane

    Reply
  15. wingboy

    Let’s hear more about those little jammie thingies. Are they pure fruit? Are they sugared? Have pectin? Shelf life? Free samples?? -TomI don’t have this information yet, I haven’ t seen them just tasted them in cookies. I’m guessing they are sweetened, but I don’t know on the other answers. Keep watching the web page for more info. Mary@ KAF

    Reply
  16. bonniewhite

    MaryJane, you are indeed a cruel, cruel woman. Now you have all of us salivating over the Jammies – thanks a lot! What was the post about, again? I forget.
    So….if one were to use these to top thumbprint cookies, do you think they would melt? I can’t wait to use them in scones.
    The Jammy Bits don’t really melt exactly like regular jam, but it would still be a neat texture in thumbprint cookies. Or use jam and top with some Bits for a contrasting texture. Looks like I’ve got more experimenting to do. ~ MaryJane

    Reply
  17. yatabe

    These look great, but I would decrease the chocolate chips [sugar that we don't need] and add in more nuts – peanuts, almonds, cashews, pecans [personally i like walnuts, but not everyone agrees with me]. And in the absence of the “jam bits” I will throw in some dried cranberries and chopped, dried apples. For some reason the kids who shy away from raisins usually like the bright red cranberries. OR – King Arthur has a great dried fruit blend – just throw in a handful of that. I know – my ‘recipe’ is starting to sound like “Cranberry Chocolate Chunk Oatmeal Drops”! That’s another story …

    Reply
  18. Blakeley (Cupcake Princess)

    Those look sooo good! I’m going to make them one afternoon for a nice snack since I’m not a morning person. I don’t have any of the hi-maize flour what can you use instead?

    You can grind some oatmeal or use some whole wheat flour instead. JMD@KAF

    Reply
  19. milkwithknives

    Oh, my. My husb is absolutely over the edge about cookies, and these would be perfect for him to take away for his hiking weekends. The only thing is that we (I) hate greasy cookies and usually cut the butter in half. Where these already have the fat from the peanut butter, do you suppose I could just leave the butter out entirely, or would they be too dry? I’ll definitely be giving them a bash, maybe with toasted oats and some millet seeds I have in my pantry.We haven’t tried that variation. Give it a try and let us know how it comes out. Mary@ KAF

    Reply
  20. jammy thingies

    ‘ These sweet little bits ARE going to be available from us this coming HOLIDAY season, but I was so excited about them I just had to show them to you now.’

    Labor Day is a holiday… :)
    So true, but I didn’t want to jinx the weather by saying Winter holidays. Winter is a cuss word here at this time of year.

    Reply
  21. AJ

    Oh! These are going to be wonderful. I went straight to your fruit blend and ordered immediately. All I needed was something to use it in. I want to use it with oatmeal and coconut in my cookies. I don’t have the Hi-Maize but I’ll use some of the ground oatmeal I make and keep on hand.
    (I make mine with my blender)

    Reply
  22. erinhibshman

    These look like just the thing to make my mornings back to teacher inservice next week a little better for my fellow teachers! I was also glad to see another idea for the Hi Maize flour that I ordered by accident in my last order — I like it, and definitely will be trying it out with this recipe! Those jammy bites look very interesting – peanut butter and jammy bit cookies perhaps?? :)
    Ah, yes, I remember in-service from my teaching days. Any treats will certainly help the day along. Have fun and Happy School Year! ~ MaryJane

    Reply
  23. biobaker

    Great idea, but shame on you for using all-purpose flour! Notwithstanding your waxing poetic about the AP — it IS nice stuff — this would be such a perfect place to use KAF’s white whole wheat. Even though I use white whole wheat (or regular whole wheat) in just about everything, not everyone shares my preference for the “wheatier” flavor. In these cookies, however, the white whole wheat will disappear; I doubt that anyone would be able to point to the difference!
    You are so right biobaker, but I have a hard time eating whole wheat flours due to an allergy, so I don’t use them very often. This would work beautifully with WWW though. ~ MaryJane

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  24. D.

    Little jam bits!?!?!! Those would be wonderful in my scones!!! That was so cruel! ;) Ok, I’m sure they are equally amazing in these cookies. I promise to make a batch this weekend. I’ll be checking the site daily in hopes the bits arrive early. Thanks for the heads up.

    Reply
  25. mboone5758

    Where is the nutritional information for these cookies? I need that–especially the grams of carbs before I can make them.

    My user name and PW was already there waiting for me to sign in.We are not able to provide a nutritionals count for this recipe as it is very flexible, and bakers are encouraged to use their choice of ingredients for add ins. Therefore, the analysis will vary greatly depending on the ingredients used.

    If you would like to calculate the information for your version of the cookies, there are several free services on line that can help you with this. Try http://www.nutritionaldata.com or a Google search for free nutritional analysis. Mary@KAF

    Reply
  26. erolb1

    I’d have to say that cookies for breakfast are weird but not extreme, given the amount of sugary stuff often found in “traditional” breakfasts (pancakes/waffles/french toast with syrup, oatmeal with brown sugar, toast with jelly or jam, donuts and other breakfast pastries, sugar-coated sugar-bombs breakfast cereals…)

    I’m also reminded of the old Bill Cosby “chocolate cake for breakfast!” routine.
    Too funny! I actually printed out a copy of that routine to quote, but couldn’t fit it in just right. For those of you who have never see this hysterical take on family life, you can find the video on Youtube. ~ MaryJane

    Reply
  27. Ricardo Neves Gonzalez - Petrópolis, R.J. - BRAZIL

    I have an assortment of buttered biscuits in my list and some of the favorites here are EXACTLY whole wheat biscuits. My recipe is similar, but i´d never tried a 100% whole wheat. My biscuits mix some whole wheat plus all purpose. I have a nice experience with oat biscuits filled inside with dates, prunes, figs. They´re amazing. I fill with dried fruits among two pieces of biscuits and they´re AMAZING.
    Here in Brazil we have popular biscuits in markets filled with guava jam they call here CASADINHOS ( wedges ) and they´re loved by all.
    But my biscuits are lot finest, they´re crunchy made with excelent butter of fine quality.
    I´ll give a try on this 100% whole wheat recipe!
    They´re seems to be TASTEFUL!!
    Nice post!!!

    Reply
  28. lbsmmd

    The recipe looks great but my kids are peanut allergic – I’d love to keep that protein – any suggestions for substitutions? Tree nuts are ok – I have never tried baking with other nut butters. Do they work? Are there other options?
    thanks
    Yes other nut butters will work. Choose a flavor you like and it will be great. You can also use a seed butter-I have used sunflower seed butter and have liked it. JMD@KAF

    Reply
  29. kaf-sub-bonnie10548

    These look delicious, but I have a peanut allergy – is there a variation that doesn’t require peanut butter?
    You can try using a seed butters-sunflower seed butter is one I have found to be very nice-or if you can use tree nuts there are several different tree nut butters that will taste good in this recipe. JMD @KAF

    Reply
  30. Angela

    I have 2 children who don’t eat peanut butter, but would love these. What could I substitute? Thanks! And the Jammy things are on my wish list now, great in scones I think! Almond or cashew butter would work. If these aren’t possible, you might add an additional 1/2 cup butter and a couple of tablespoons more flour. Ground-up canned garbanzo beans might work, also.These tips would be experiments, and as such might not work. We haven’t tried them.Have fun with it. Mary@ KAF

    Reply
  31. fawall728

    Could I replace the peanut butter? What would I use?
    The jammy bits are definitely on my need list! Replacing the peanut butter would be an experiment. You might try adding another 1/2 cup of butter in it’s place and maybe a couple of extra tablespoons of flour. As I said thiis would be an experiment. No guarantees that it would work. Have fun with it. Mary@KAF

    Reply
  32. robynb

    Yeah, yeah, nice cookies – but what about the jammie bits? They are COMPLETELY overshadowing the cookies for me! Contrary to another earlier post, I LOVE strawberry jam – can they come in strawberry too?? What about apricot? Orange marmalade?!?! Now you’ve got me wondering if I could semi-freeze jam and then roll bits in flour or cornstarch to make my own jammie bits… hmmm… Better offer them soon or I may start experimenting :-)
    Hey Robyn, we are all for experimenting. I’ve only seen those two flavors so far, but I’ll check with our team to see if there are others out there. ~ MaryJane

    Reply
  33. lnfb

    Any chance of getting nutritional analysis for all these wonderful recipes? I am now cooking and baking for a type II diabetic and need to know what I am giving him.

    The cookies sound great and I’d love to make them.
    Thank you for your email. We are not able to provide a nutritionals count for this recipe as it is very flexible, and bakers are encouraged to use their choice of ingredients for add ins. Therefore, the analysis will vary greatly depending on the ingredients used.

    If you would like to calculate the information for your version of the cookies, there are several free services on line that can help you with this. Try http://www.nutritionaldata.com or a Google search for free nutritional analysis. JMD@KAF

    Thanks, Joan – here’s the nutrition info. – Nutrition per serving (1 slice, 51g): 150 cal, 3.5g fat, 5g protein, 24g total carbohydrate, 5g sugar, 3g dietary fiber, 0mg cholesterol, 200mg sodium. – PJH

    Reply
  34. mmotherof2

    OMGosh! Jam bits? I am going to buy those ASAP! This cookie recipe sounds so yummy -it could be dangerous though as I can easily justify eating these cookies for breakfast-no problem here! I am going to try adding some dried fruit-cranberries, apricots and some pecans!

    Reply
  35. Erin

    Man these look awesome. I made a batch of breakfast cookies that ended up being all rubbery and weird but these, i want to try. Could you substitute honey for the white sugar? I feel like there’s a lot of not good for ya things in here

    Honey is less sweet and it brings along all of that moisture with it. To incorporate this change you will need to increase the amount of flour to achieve a similar consistency. Experiment, have fun! Frank @ KAF.

    Reply
  36. Liz

    I’m excited about the jam bits! Make sure you post on your blog when they are available. Thanks!

    You betcha Liz! ~ MaryJane

    Reply
  37. Fatima

    Thanks so much for these Great cookies! can they be converted to become Gluten Free using KAF Gluten free flour and gluten free oats?

    Thank You!

    I have not experimented with the g-f multi-purpose flour in this recipe. Give it a try. And please share your results. Frank @ KAF.

    Reply
  38. clareomalley

    I have to bake gluten free. Surprisingly, these turned out so well, my husband requested them again – and he hates my GF food.

    Here’s the recipe with my edits in parentheses.

    1/2 cup butter, softened
    1 cup peanut butter (instead I used one cup mashed ripe bananas)
    1 1/4 cups brown sugar
    2 teaspoons vanilla extract
    2 eggs
    1/3 cup milk
    1 1/4 cup King Arthur Unbleached All Purpose Flour (I used KAF GF flour. I have also used Pamela’s mix, or Bob’s Red Mill as long as you use Xantham gum with Bob’s).
    1/3 cup Hi Maize Natural Fiber (I instead used Trader Joe’s Peanut Flour in an equal amount.)
    1/3 cup dried milk. whole or non-fat
    1 teaspoon cinnamon
    1 teaspoon salt
    4 1/2 cups total add ins of your choice: raisins, coconut, barley flakes, oat flakes, granola, chocolate chips, dried fruit, nuts etc.
    I used:
    1 cup mini choc chips
    1 cup quinoa flakes
    1 cup GF flax cereal
    3/4 cup dried canberries pre-soaked in orange juice
    3/4 unsweetened coconut flakes

    Reply
  39. clareomalley

    I have to bake gluten free. Surprisingly, these turned out so well, my husband requested them again – and he reluctantly eats my GF food.

    Here’s the recipe with my edits in parentheses.

    1/2 cup butter, softened
    1 cup peanut butter (instead I used one cup mashed ripe bananas)
    1 1/4 cups brown sugar
    2 teaspoons vanilla extract
    2 eggs
    1/3 cup milk
    1 1/4 cup King Arthur Unbleached All Purpose Flour (I used KAF GF flour. I have also used Pamela’s mix, or Bob’s Red Mill as long as you use Xantham gum with Bob’s).
    1/3 cup Hi Maize Natural Fiber (I instead used Trader Joe’s Peanut Flour in an equal amount.)
    1/3 cup dried milk. whole or non-fat (I used Dari-free vanilla)
    1 teaspoon cinnamon
    1 teaspoon salt
    4 1/2 cups total add ins of your choice: raisins, coconut, barley flakes, oat flakes, granola, chocolate chips, dried fruit, nuts etc.
    I used:
    1 cup mini choc chips
    1 cup quinoa flakes
    1 cup GF flax cereal
    3/4 cup dried cranberries pre-soaked in orange juice
    3/4 unsweetened coconut flakes

    It was *very* moist. I was worried they would spread, but they were almost like a whoopie pie-cakeiness. I used my blue KAF cookie scoop. Baked 1 test cookie for exactly 18 minutes and it turned out perfectly.

    I’ve made this 4 times now and my whole family loves them. I also like that I can bring something relative healthy and gluten-free to play dates, and they will get devoured.

    Thanks!

    Reply
  40. sayed41

    Is there any reason that canola oil cannot be substituted for butter? It would provide for unsaturated fat and with the additions (chocolate, coconut, jam bits, etc) the flavor may not be compromised much.

    When substituting fats, the general rule is to use like substitutes. That is solid for solid, or liquid for liquid. The form of the fat and how it is used in the recipe directly influences the structure of the finished product.

    In this recipe the butter is creamed. Creaming requires a fat that is solid at room temperature. Canola Oil may not work. Since this particular recipe also calls for peanut butter in the creaming step, I think this would be an experiment worth trying. Frank @ KAF.

    Reply
  41. fran16250

    I made these last night, or I should say I made the dough. I used the new Jammy Bits and oatmeal and cinnmon chips for the 4-1/2 cups of mix-ins, about a cup and a half of each. I baked them up this morning and they came out so tasty. I’ve dubbed them PB & J oatmeal cookies. I really love those Jammy Bits, I’m just dissapointed that I used them all up in these cookies. I was hoping to get to use them in scones too. I guess I’ll just have to buy some more.

    Reply
  42. dmeaux1000

    I swore I was not going to bake anything for a month or 2 but I was thinking about these cookies all day today and could not resist. Just made a double batch and they are really really great. I used wheat germ, ground flax seed, unsweetened coconut, mini chocolate morsels, toasted pecans, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, homemade granola, craisins and KA’s dried fruit blend. They ended up tasting like a granola cookie and were well worth the time it took to make them. I did cut back on the sugar to 1 cup per batch and I ground up some oatmeal for the hi maize. Give them a try.
    These cookies are of big interest and everyone is finding so many fun ways to modify them to their tastes and dietary needs. Thank you for sharing your ideas with us and happy baking! ~ART

    Reply
  43. beachdee

    Nice idea, sounds yummy. I am with those who think that’s a LOT of sugar (esp. for a non-dessert cookie); when I try these I’ll be cutting back at least to 3/4 cup, because dried fruits add plenty more and we are going for at least somewhat healthy here. Also agree w/ biobaker, I’ll sub in at least half whole-grain flour (spelt/wheat/barley). I’m curious to try the quinoa flakes I saw at my co-op, along with the oatmeal, for added nutrition.

    For the person who asked about sub for peanut butter–are you able to use almond butter? Love the stuff. And the subbing for butter — try coconut oil, which altho called “oil” is solid at room temp… I use it all the time in place of butter (altho I don’t shy away from butter, either, just margarines and most veg/seed oils). Very healthful, too (here’s a link to a quick-and-dirty discussion: http://www.livestrong.com/article/28296-health-properties-coconut-oil/). If you like the coconut flavor, use the virgin coconut oil, and if you want flavorless, get the slightly more refined but still healthful kind.

    I think I know what my next batch of cookies is going to be!
    Thank you for sharing your information with us. It is great to learn how different people interpret and experiment with this recipe. ~Amy @ KAF

    Reply
  44. "Marque "

    I just found this post and while I have not yet read the recipe I make a breakfast cookie based on the traditional tollhouse recipe. I add more oats then flour,a lot of ground nuts,chips and raisins or other dried fruit. They come out very cake-y and high in about twelve minutes (almost faster then you can fill the next pan) and go very quickly. And for a man who refuses to eat breakfast but will eat these by the handful, they are a very good nutritious meal!!
    I hope you will try our recipe and let us know what you think. You can improvise with whatever ingredients you have around the pantry and they might even please your husband. ~Amy

    Reply
  45. Jess

    I know this is an old post, but I wanted to ask a question about making the recipe non-dairy. I saw the idea of subbing canola oil for the butter (since there’s peanut butter, it might work in this recipe) and I can use soymilk for the cow milk. But what about the nonfat dried milk. Are there any good non-dairy subs for that? What role does it play in the texture/look of the cookie? Thanks so much.
    HI Jess,
    The dried milk is in the recipe for tenderizing and added calcium. You can definitely leave it out and still get great cookies. Happy baking! ~ MaryJane

    Reply
  46. Kathleen

    These are the best. My husband loves them and they’re easy for him to grab on his way out the door. For add-ins, I use oats, coconut (unsweetened), all-bran cereal, dried cherries, peanuts, choc chips, and sunflower seeds. Once, I ran out of peanut butter and subbed 1/2 peanut butter and 1/2 nutella. I think that batch was even better than all peanut butter.

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  47. rochelle_keefer

    Just smelling them in the oven I knew like most everyone else that has commented: I will be making more of these. I cut the brown sugar in half and used half the butter with a 1/4 cup of applesauce. Also used KA White Whole Wheat flour- my favorite! I couldn’t wait for jammy bits to come in the mail so I picked up some dried sweetened strawberries at Trader Joes and those worked. Also added chia seeds for omega 3s and wheat germ for folic acid and oat bran for fiber. These made the perfect pregnancy cookie. And you get to be so creative! Great recipe- thanks!
    Go glad you are happy with them. I need to whip up a batch myself. Hard to believe my own kiddo has been eating this before school for 12 years! ~ MaryJane

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  48. Lurl

    What can be substituted for the chocolate chips. I can’t stand the taste of them nor chocolate in any cookie. How about something like dates or dried papaya or both?
    Chocolate chips give me the creeps and none of my children like them or anything with it in it.
    Thanks

    Reply
    1. MaryJane Robbins , post author

      Hi Lurl,
      Yes, you can use any kind of dried fruits, nuts, peel, seeds, whatever you prefer for your add-ins. This recipe is completely customizable. ~ MJ

  49. Yolanda

    These sound so good that I’m going to bake them for my colleagues on the first day of school next week. Most of all, I like the variety of add-ins that can be added. I think a large plate in our coffee room will brighten the day as we start a new academic year. I’ll provide copies of the recipe, too!

    Reply

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