Buttery Sourdough Buns: a new take on sourdough

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Ah, sourdough bread…

A thick, hearty crust, chewy interior, full of flavor, and absolutely addictive.

Or, thick, hearty crisp crust, chewy soft, moist interior, full of flavor, and absolutely addictive.

Are you ready to see sourdough bread in a brand new light?

Meet our Buttery Sourdough Buns.

We bake with sourdough quite a bit here at King Arthur Flour, but what we make is usually some variation on a typical rustic sourdough bread. You know the type; heck, I just described it above. A crunchy crust, an interior that’s chewy rather than soft, and lots of good, “bready” flavor.

But one day, it occurred to me there’s no reason not to take sourdough bread in a different direction.

We’d already posted a recipe for a sliceable sandwich loaf: Clay’s Multi-Grain Sourdough Sandwich Bread.

So why not a sourdough dinner roll?

Easy, I thought.

Oh, how wrong I was!

I went through version after version of these buns in search of the perfect balance in both flavor (not TOO sour, but noticeably tangy), and texture (soft, not chewy, but with some body).

My first experiments included too much sourdough starter; the sour flavor overwhelmed the mild taste of the remaining ingredients (butter, milk, egg, a touch of sugar). It also weakened the gluten enough to shred the buns – so much for texture.

So I cut back on the starter, but still wasn’t getting the right taste; the starter seemed to be fighting with everything else, flavor-wise. So out went the milk; down went the sugar.

And, light bulb moment: I decided to make the butter a brush-on “filling,” rather than a dough ingredient. Ah, THERE’S that buttery flavor!

Next issue: the buns wouldn’t brown. They tasted great, but their pallid, heavy-cream color left a lot to be desired, looks-wise.

Solution? I tried brushing with beaten egg; it made their crust sticky. Egg white, ditto. Milk, didn’t help with browning. Butter, ditto.

In the end, I added paprika to the butter filling, giving the buns a deep-gold swirl. And baked them towards the top of the oven, hoping for the best.

Which wasn’t (and still isn’t) perfect. If anyone bakes these rolls and comes up with a solution that yields a beautiful brown crust, please let me know!

Anyway, this is why we call it the test kitchen, right? We test, test, test recipes, then test some more, until we come up with something we feel is good enough for you, our readers, to try.

As always, we welcome your feedback. It takes a community to make a really good, recipe, right?

Let’s start with some starter – 1/2 cup (about 4 ounces), to be exact.

Does it need to be fed before using? Here’s feedback from one of our readers: “I have made these twice so far, with both fed and unfed starter. Either way, they come out beautifully, rising a bit more with the fed starter.”

So, feed your starter for a bit more rise, but it’s not strictly necessary.

Here’s my starter – top, as it looked coming out of the fridge; bottom, as it looked next morning, after feeding it with 1 cup of flour and 1/2 cup lukewarm water. It definitely bubbled up a bit.

Combine the 1/2 cup starter with the following:

3 cups (12 3/4 ounces) King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
2 1/2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 tablespooon sugar
1 1/4 teaspoons salt
1 large egg
5 tablespoons soft butter (plus additional butter for filling and topping)
2/3 cup lukewarm water

Mix and knead — using your hands, a stand mixer, or a bread machine set on the dough cycle — to make a soft, smooth dough.

If you’re using a mixer, you’ll notice the dough is quite sticky; after about 4 minutes of kneading at medium speed, scrape the dough away from the sides and off the bottom of the bowl, then knead for another 4 minutes or so. The dough will still be tacky, but shouldn’t be unmanageably sticky.

Place the dough in a lightly greased bowl or other container, and allow it to rise for 1 1/2 to 2 hours, until it’s just about doubled in bulk.

Gently deflate the dough, and transfer it to a lightly greased work surface.

Roll and pat the dough into a rough rectangle approximately 12″ x 16″. Put 2 tablespoons melted butter in a small bowl, and add 1/4 teaspoon paprika, if desired; it’s there for color, and accentuates the buns’ swirl, but omit it if you wish. Spread the dough with the melted butter.

Starting with a long side, roll the dough into a log.

Cut the log in 1″ slices, using a sharp knife, or a piece of dental floss looped between your fingers.

Lightly grease two 8″ or 9″ round cake pans. Arrange 8 buns in each pan.

See the picture on top? I was trying an experiment. Should I flatten the rolls in the pan (left), or just leave them as is (right)?

Well, the flattened rolls filled the pan to a greater extent; but the unflattened ones rose taller.

And after baking, they all looked the same; so no need to flatten the rolls initially.

Cover the pans, and let the buns rise for 60 minutes, until they’re noticeably puffy. Don’t let these buns rise too long; you want them to have enough rising power left to expand nicely in the oven.

Towards the end of the rising time, preheat the oven to 350°F.

Melt 3 tablespoons butter, and brush the buns with about half of it; you’ll use the remainder after they’re baked.

Bake the buns for 22 to 25 minutes; they’ll color only slightly.

Remove the buns from the oven, turn them out onto a rack, and brush them with the remaining butter.

Serve hot or warm.

You’ll find that despite their somewhat “doughy” look, these buns actually have a buttery-crisp crust; think crescent roll. I found them quite addictive, and had to stop myself from having one more bun, “just to be sure.”

Leftovers? Wrap tightly, and store at room temperature for up to a week. To reheat, place the buns on a baking sheet, tent lightly with aluminum foil, and bake for about 10 minutes in a preheated 350°F oven.

Read, bake, and review (please) our recipe for Buttery Sourdough Buns. Remember, I’m looking for feedback on how to get a browner crust…

Print just the recipe.

PJ Hamel
About

PJ Hamel was born in Wisconsin, grew up in New England, and graduated from Brown University. She was a journalist in Massachusetts and Maine before joining the King Arthur Flour Company in 1990, where she's been ever since. Author or co-author of three King Arthur ...

comments

    1. Dawn

      I am really excited to try this recipe! I am wondering if I can prepare them up to slicing and arranging them in the pans, then refrigerate them and take them out later in the day to rise and then bake. That would serve well for a Sunday afternoon dinner.
      I proof my bagels in the refrigerator overnight which only serves to make them better…

    2. PJ Hamel , post author

      Biff, these buns don’t brown well, it’s true. Yes, you could try brushing with egg yolk; personally, I don’t like the sticky/shiny effect that yields. Brush with oil, and t“““`ry a tiny bit of broiling at the end, if you like. PJH

  1. SheenaC

    Oh my! I can’t wait to try these! My family will go crazy with happiness.

    I’m new to this blog. I love reading the posts and comments and noticed that several people mention getting posts through email. Can anyone tell me how to set this up? I’d love to be an email subscriber. I’m sorry to ask this off topic question, but I didn’t know who else to contact.

    Thanks, PJ, for another delicious blog read!!

    Sheena, not a problem. Simply go to our King Arthur home page and sign up for our email newsletter – you’ll see the signup box lower left on the page, “sign up for email updates and savings” – most of the new blog posts will be included as a link in the email. Enjoy, and welcome! PJH

    Reply
  2. Rebecca

    Can you make these without the added yeast as long as they are allowed to rise for several hours?

    Sure, Rebecca, you just have to be willing to wait quite a long time, depending on the strength of your starter. I’d suggest feeding the starter several times over the course of a few days in preparation, to get it good and vigorous. PJH

    Reply
    1. juliana

      My starter is really vigorous, as you say, PJ, and I tried to make these yesterday without the use of yeast, only sourdough. I tried a suggestion of adding half the measure for sourdough, and it seems I should have added some flour too.
      I live in Brazil, it was a hot day, and I made the dough by hand… many cons. it came out really yummy, with very nice smell and beautifully browned, but I know they didn’t rise enough, and I am sure my dough was too wet.
      PJ, how much do you suggest I add of flour? and more or less how much more time do you suppose they will take to puff?

      thanks a lot,

    2. MaryJane Robbins

      Hi Juliana,
      Use only enough flour to make a tacky, supple dough. If you are working in a hot climate, you could try putting your dough in the refrigerator for the first half hour of its rise. This should help you control the fermentation. Hope this helps.~Jaydl@KAF

    3. Anna Joy

      These rolls are wonderful!! I left out the added yeast and let them rise for about 6-10 hrs for the first rise (I couldn’t get to making them as soon as I wanted to after this rise, but they still did beautifully in the second rise and in the oven). Besides rise time, the only change I made was that my dough initially needed more water (maybe 1/4-1/3 Cup) to come together in the mixer. This may have something to do with different hydration levels of starter. Also, I added a few tablespoons of maple syrup to my melted butter and this not only aided in the browning, but gave it a light, but wonderful sweetness. Thank you for the recipe very much!!!

  3. onezestyitalian

    PJ…try melting butter & adding a small amount of Lyles syrup to brush over the tops for the last 5 minutes or so of baking…still brush with the melted butter afterwards. If it’s too sweet you can decrease the sugar in the bread mixture.

    Hmmm… sugar makes sense, doesn’t it? Thanks! PJH

    Reply
  4. Natalia Rivera

    I think the buns are pale because of the acidity in sourdough. Alkaline conditions promote browning (see: lye pretzels). So as a wild guess, perhaps brush the buns with a baking soda solution? That won’t contribute extra sweetness to the buns like a sugary solution would if the buns aren’t supposed to be sweet.

    Reply
  5. epicharis

    What about crushed saffron threads? I bet you can’t get much golder than that!

    That would definitely make them golden throughout – interesting idea…. PJH

    Reply
  6. suad1186

    I am not all that “experienced” even at 72. Every recipe to me is a new adventure. But while bland, pale color doesn’t bother, wouldn’t they be heavenly with a chocolate icing or ganache drizzled over top?

    Definitely a possibility I didn’t think of – thanks! PJH

    Reply
  7. LOU!

    These rolls are The Most Delicious rolls I’ve ever eaten – or baked, and I’ve been making bread for more than30 years!, They’re light and UNbelieveably addicting! While I used paprika, I don’t feel it’s needed – they browned beautifully! I used fed starter; mixed it in my bread machine; let the shaped rolls proof only about 30 minutes; and baked them for about 25 minutes. I’m with “suad” – sweeten ‘em up. I’m thinking these would make some pretty spectacular Cinnamon Rolls! Think I’ll go feed the starter right now! Thanks for this AWESOME recipe!!!!

    LOU! Thank YOU! I love to share our readers’ enthusiasm… Let us know how the cinnamon buns turn out, OK? PJH

    Reply
  8. 1breadlover

    I have been reading and using King Arthur recipes for years. I love the blog! Having kept a sourdough starter going for 30 years I had to try this recipe – absolutely light and yummy (hard to stop eating and share with the family)!

    I did the following for browning the tops (did not have paprika): when the buns done I removed them from the oven and turned on the broiler – brushed the top of the buns with the remaining butter and put them under the hot broiler -Watch Carefully, it did not take them long to acquire a soft touch of brown. This recipe will go in as a keeper. Keep the wonderful recipes coming.

    Thanks – broiling sounds like a good option, and would also serve to crisp the crust even more. Glad you like the buns – I do, too… Happy New Year! PJH

    Reply
  9. Tonia

    PJ — If you can find it (it’s old, original copyright 1967, newer Dover edition 1983) check out Ada Lou Roberts “Sourdough Breads and Coffee Cakes”. It’s a great little book about sourdough that gives several ways to make a starter and then many recipes using the starter; one of my favorites for sweet bread dough makes excellent yeasted coffee cakes (or kuchen!) and also rolls. Good flavor, browns nicely, tastes great!

    Happy New year!!

    Tonia, I used to ahve that book – I’ll bet it’s in our KAF library somewhere. Thanks for the reminder – and a very happy new year to you, too. PJH

    Reply
  10. LOU!

    A cinnamon bun update: Oh, WOW! I baked them yesterday afternoon for a New Year’s morning treat, and was it ever! I spread the melted butter over the whole rolled-out rectangle, then over half I sprinkled cinnamon/sugar (NO paprika on the butter-only side either). BOTH pans of rolls were OOTW!! (Out Of This World!). The frosting was a simple confectioner’s sugar with The Amazing flavoring of Fiori di Sicilia! What a terrific start to the New Year! YUM! Thanks again for such a wonderful recipe!!!

    Lou, thanks for the update – now I absolutely have to try these as cinnamon buns… love the Fiori di Sicilia addition, too. PJH

    Reply
  11. AlisonNich

    Trying these tonight and can’t wait. Guess I’ll have to! Just an FYI, you don’t list the topping ingredients here and I was confused if the 5 tbl of butter was to be divided between the recipe and the toppings. So this should really have some buttery taste. Diet starts tomorrow . . . Looking at the actual recipe cleared it up but might be worth mentioning here too. Thanks for all the recipes!

    Thanks for the feedback, Alison – I added some clarification to the blog as suggested. Hope these worked well for you – I had one with my supper tonight, they’re delicious rewarmed in a toaster oven… PJH

    Reply
  12. glpruett

    I’m with Eleyana–my starter needs some attention too! This is first on my to-do list tonight and the dough gets mixed the first thing in the morning. And I love the idea of making one pan of rolls plain and one cinnamon–YUM!

    Thanks for all the great ideas and I hope everyone has a Happy New Year, baking all the way!

    I think you’ll be pleased with the recipe – and I totally have to try them as cinnamon rolls (or sticky buns). Let us know how they come out, OK? Happy New Year! PJH

    Reply
  13. AnneInWA

    PJ,

    I made these as cinnamon rolls, and boy were they good. I got them to brown up by melting butter and adding KAF’s wonderfully full flavored Grade B maple syrup, then about the last 5 minutes or so brushed it on. Let me tell you, the aroma was enough to drive a person mad! Thanks for another use for my sourdough starter! I love sourdough, next I am wanting to use some starter in your perfect burger buns recipe… Thanks again PJ!

    Anne

    Thanks for another great browning (and flavor!) tip, Anne – PJH

    Reply
  14. Laurie

    Can I make these rolls with your sourdough flavor rather than using a starter? Thanks

    Sure, if you like – they texture might be different, and they won’t keep as well, but give it a try, Laurie… PJH

    Reply
  15. shofur4two

    I think I found a solution to the browning issue. I do not know if there is a way to send a picture to you, but here is what I did and the flavor is great as well.
    When I read the blog I was not thrilled with your paprika as a way to get the color. I wanted a flavor that I would love as well.
    I mixed vermont cheese powder, fresh dill and a small amount of crushed garlic for the filling.. What I discovered is that the cheese powder when brushed on top with the butter browned beautifully.
    Personally I think the flavor is divine as well.

    Wow, that sounds super-tasty – thanks, I’ll try it! PJH

    Reply
  16. Suzy

    I loved this dough and wonder if it could be baked in any other shape?
    Like regular rolls?
    I am trying the cinnamon sugar next.

    Totally, Suzy – a sandwich loaf, plain rolls, soft/chewy bread sticks, garlic knots… however you want to shape it should be fine. Oh, now I’m hungry! :) PJH

    Reply
  17. aamoe

    I saw this recipe last week and had to get some starter brewing – about to feed it for the first time today and will be baking these for the first time this weekend – can hardly wait, after reading all these rave reviews!

    Addie

    Reply
  18. "elianna m"

    The best rolls I’ve ever made. Some of the best I’ve ever tasted, too. I used lots of the paprika/butter, and they actually did turn out a very nice golden brown on top! Thank you! :)

    Glad to hear these did well for you, Elianna – I find them quite addictive, personally, particularly rewarmed in a toaster oven so they get crispy on the outside… PJH

    Reply
  19. wyffly1

    Haven’t made these yet, but: would diastatic malt powder help with the browning issue? Works like a charm for my other yeast breads.

    Good thought – have to try that. Thanks! PJH

    Reply
  20. "Joey D in LA"

    Wyffly1 beat me to it… diastatic malt powder should help. Also, going a little more savory, I used an Irish Garlic-Herb Butter as the filling, with the paprika for color. My-oh-my. New favorite garlic knots!

    Malt does increase browning, it’s true…. but I might try non-diastatic just so I don’t edge too close to changing the buns’ texture. And garlic knots – inspiration! Thanks, Joey… PJH

    Reply
  21. mikest

    Okay, finally got my starter and tried it. Nice and airy. I didn’t go with the paprika, I used a little cocoa to make it brown. Not enough to taste, just to color. However I did put some in the struesel. I mixed 1 tsp cocoa, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1/2 c sugar and 1/2 c nuts and sprinkled it on the 12×16 square then rolled. I then melted butter and put it on top after the rise. Mmmmm…. :-)

    Reply
  22. Robyn

    Doesn’t flax meal cause baked goods to brown more? Perhaps adding some golden flax meal would help with the browning without changing the flavor. I’ve noticed that the golden version of flax meal also doesn’t change the texture of baked goods a lot.

    Flax’s oil is supposed to help brown baked goods, it’s true – I’ll have to try this, Robyn, thanks! PJH

    Reply
  23. lgjswift

    These rolls have become one of my best treats, I have used them for cinnamon rolls, garlic rolls, and just good old butter rolls. I have traveled a lot this year, MO, IL, KY, and live in TX. I have my King Arthur sour dough starter and I take it with me everywhere. Everyone loves the cinnamon rolls, and I top them with my own version of cream cheese frosting. I don’t always measure so the basic cinnamon filling is this: one stick unsalted butter, brown sugar and cinnamon to taste. I DO NOT melt the butter, but beat with an elec mixer until smooth, add brown sugar until it looks and tastes right (enough to spread and grainy) add cinnamon to taste. I then spread the mixture on my dough (it should be thick and out to all edges) before rolling into the log for cutting. Everything else is by the recipe, but no color is needed in the melted butter I brush on the top. If I want these for an early morning treat, I do everything up to the rise after they are in the pans. The pans get covered and put in the refrigerator overnight. The next morning I give them an extra 30 min to rise before putting them in the oven. These will have a nice gooey bottom similar to Monkey Bread. I let everyone add the frosting to their own taste (I like lots lol). We all love this recipe, thank you King Arthur Bakers!!!

    Reply
  24. kathnwes

    Made these last night. The dough was a dream to work with, and the finished product was perfect as far as texture. Loved that. But did anyone else find that these were extremely bland (apart from the sourness) I add herbs and still found that they were extremely flat.

    Any suggestions would be welcomed. Made recipe exactly per the instructions.

    Thanks Much.

    Reply
  25. JavaJan51

    Thanks so much for sharing this WONDERFUL recipe with us!! It’s become my family’s favorite (as well as my extended family, church family, and friends)! Works great for cinnamon rolls, too, using the suggestions found here.

    Here’s something that warmed my heart….the other evening we had a family get-together and my nephew, Connor, who’s 9 and shares a birthday the day after mine, said, “I know part of what I want for my birthday. Aunt Jan’s sourdough rolls and her fruit salad!” Now if that isn’t a huge vote of confidence for these rolls, I don’t know what is!! I did tell him that it wasn’t exactly “my” recipe, but I doubt he even heard that part of the conversation….lol!

    Thanks again,
    Jan

    Reply
  26. Lollypaul

    Want to make these. Is there a problem with doubling the recipe, so I can use the full cup of discard starter? Also, what about freezing?

    Sure, Lolly, doubling is fine. And freezing is fine, too – wrap baked rolls in plastic, then in foil. Keep frozen no more than 3-4 weeks. Thaw, still wrapped, int he fridge; then reheat till warm in the oven. PJH

    Reply
  27. iannie2

    Oh my, yes, these are absolutely delicious!! I change it up a bit every now and again by adding different savory seasonings to the dough and melted butter. As we love the flavor and texture so much, I used the dough to make some “s” shaped dinner rolls for Easter – nothing but rave reviews from our guests.

    So glad to hear these have become one of your favorites – I feel the same way. Thanks for sharing here – PJH

    Reply
  28. Cecelia McKnight

    Here’s what I made for Easter:

    Place in covered container the night before:

    1/2 cup water
    1/8 tsp. yeast
    1 cup flour

    Next day:

    Mix together and let mixture rise approx. 8-10 mins. until bubbly:
    3/4 cup water
    1 tsp. sugar
    1 tsp. yeast

    Place “sour dough” mixture to mixing bowl. Add yeast mixture and 1 TBSP oil. Add a little flour, then 1-1/4 tsp. salt. Add flour until dough is sticky, but doesn’t stick to your hands. Place in a covered, greased container and let rise approximately 90 minutes. Roll out to 1″ thick and cut with cookie cutter or biscuit cutter. (I used bunny cookie cutter). Let rise approximately 45 minutes. Brush with 1 whole egg with 1 TBSP water mixture. Bake 375 degrees until golden brown.

    This is my pizza dough recipe. I decided to try it for the buns. It was awesome! Everyone loved it and the kiddies loved the bunny shaped ones.
    That sounds so awesome, Cecelia! The bunny cutter must have been a hit! Elisabeth

    Reply
  29. Barb

    I adapted this recipe to a whole wheat cinnamon bun using blend of 50% whole wheat for both starter and dough, and a bit of whipping cream mixed with plain sparkling water for the liquid. Also substituted 2 tbs NJ Pine Barren honey for the sugar in the recipe. They where the best buns I’ve ever made! Used half the recipe for the cinnamon buns and rest went into a small sandwich loaf when I discovered I was out of multigrain bread. It worked perfect both ways, the cinnamon rolls and bread both had beautiful brown crust! Planning on turning at least part of the next batch into Pains aux Chocolat. I am definitely keeping this recipe as a reference, though I would like to see a whole wheat version of it.

    Fantastic idea, Barb! I’ll be sure to submit the idea to our Test Kitchen to see if we can’t get crackin’ on a whole wheat version. Best, Kim@KAF

    Reply
  30. Katie

    I made these today with just sourdough starter, no yeast. Did the first rise for an hour, then made their roll shape (I just did regular round rolls without added butter or rolling them out), then let them rise for another 6 hours. They were amazing and fluffy. Rose beautifully. They also didn’t need any butter on top, and had a golden browning to them.. I think this would make a good sandwich bread and I’m going to try that out someday. I also made an extra batch and used it to make cinnamon rolls, those were amazing too. If you have a good starter, you definitely don’t need yeast as long as you have the time and plan ahead. I think this is my new go to roll recipe. Thank you!

    Reply
    1. Juliana

      Hi, I tried to make these with no yeast too. I added more sourdough starter, and because of that my dough was too wet and difficult to handle. should I stay with the original amount of sourdough, is it just a matter of waiting more for the second rising?
      anyways, when ready it was really really yummy, despite of it’s bizarre shape. and it browned beatifully, without paprika or anything, just butter and happiness.
      thanks a lot,

      Ju

    2. The Baker's Hotline

      Adding more starter in this case is not a problem. However, as you noticed your starter is adding quite a bit of added moisture to your dough. As such, you will likely need to either decrease the amount of liquid used or increase the flour to make a dough that is easier to handle. Jon@KAF

  31. lizdavey

    I have made these several times just as the recipe indicates. Today I divided the dough into twelve balls, flattened them on a half sheet pans and now I have wonderful sandwich rolls. An egg wash with sesame seeds on top before baking.

    Liz, that sounds very tasty – I didn’t think of making these into sandwich rolls, and especially adding the seeds. Thanks for the tips! :) PJH

    Reply
  32. Stefanie

    Can I eliminate the salt from this recipe and still have it turn out well? I am limited to 1800mg per day, and I love, love, love bread!

    Salt can be omitted, but you do run the risk of an over-active dough since salt keeps yeast activity in check. I would shorten the rising times by half and check the dough early to be sure everything turns out. Otherwise, you should be just fine! Kim@KAF

    Reply
  33. margie

    I mixed things up a little and made these with my Russian sourdough. They were wonderful. Thank you for all your recipes.

    Reply
  34. Catherine Morris

    You written, sourdough starter, fed or unfed. Can you explain the fed or unfed. I apologize if this is a question I should know already, but I’ve never done sourdough,

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel , post author

      No worries, Catherine – sourdough can be confusing. Usually when you use sourdough for bread, you’re using it not just for flavor, but for its rising power. In order for it to “wake up” and become active, you need to feed it with flour and water before using it. When sourdough is used mostly for flavor (e.g., there’s additional yeast in the recipe, as there is in these rolls), then you can use it straight out of the fridge, without feeding it first. Hope this helps – have you read our posts on creating your sourdough starter and maintaining your starter? I think you’ll find them useful. Good luck – PJH

  35. heatherb

    I made these last night and they were phenomenal! Used fed starter and followed the recipe (sans paprika). These are a keeper, for sure. Next time I’ll try unfed starter.

    Reply
  36. Joseph Giglio

    I maintain a 100% hydration starter. How much of that do you suggest I use in this recipe? they sound wonderful and want to try it

    thanks in advance for your reply.

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Our starter is also a 100% starter! As such, you can use the amount called for in the original recipe. Jon@KAF

  37. Gary Johnston

    I’ve made these buns several times and learned something new from reading this blog. Sometimes it’s hard to know how long to knead either by hand or with a mixer. The pictures and explanations are really a great help. Thanks.

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel , post author

      Glad to hear our blog helped you, Gary – a picture may not say 1,000 words, but it’s certainly a useful tool when it comes to sharing recipes, isn’t it? Enjoy – PJH

  38. Amy Stump

    Amazing aroma and flavor and they need no additional butter ( however apple butter on them is a whole new taste experience). Now, the only question is, will there be any left for tomorrow’s thanksgiving dinner? I can’t wait to try this recipe for other rolls, sticky buns, etc.

    Reply
  39. bina

    These did not work for me. I used my reliable starter and my yeast was good. I did substitute about 1/3 of the flour with white whole wheat. They didn’t rise much or have the texture of the rolls in the photo. They tasted fine to my guests, but they disappointed me.

    Reply
    1. PJ Hamel , post author

      So sorry; it could be the white whole wheat, as this recipe makes a dough that’s slow to rise, anyway, and perhaps the whole wheat pushed it over the edge to “didn’t rise enough” territory. I hope you try them again sometime, following the recipe as written, using all-purpose flour; that way you can experience what they’re supposed to be like, and you can then make changes with a baseline in mind. Good luck – PJH

  40. Tana

    These sound like a wonderful recipe and I and I would love to make these… any chance of making them a couple days ahead of time and refrigerating them and then letting them rise and baking them?
    Thank you!

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      I would caution against allowing these rolls to rise longer than 12 hours under refrigeration. They will likely collapse before or during baking if kept for 1-2 days. Maybe try freezing the rolls after baking? Jon@KAF

    2. PJ Hamel , post author

      Tana, I think it would be better to bake them all the way, store at room temperature, and reheat for about 10 minutes in a preheated 350°F oven, tented loosely with foil, just before serving. PJH

  41. Carlaena - Kidskitchenkaleidoscope

    This recipe is to die for! Instead of the paprika, I used a sprinkle of thyme after spreading the butter. Very subtle. I did this for only half the batch, the other half I turned into cinnamon rolls. I mixed cinnamon and a touch of sugar into the butter before spreading. My family was crazy about these! I will definitely be making these again.
    Would it be ok to post this recipe to my blog? I’m a beginner blogger and this recipe is wonderful!
    Thanks for posting this recipe.

    Reply
    1. MaryJane Robbins

      Hi Carlaena,
      We are so glad you enjoyed the recipe and took your own turn with adding the thyme. Yes, we would be happy to have you share this on your blog as long as you give KAF credit for the original recipe. Happy new blogging journey! ~ MJ

  42. Linda

    Made these little beauties the other day Quick and easy As suggested made a very soft doughKneaded by hand until just right Let rise 1 1/2 hrs then deflated and spread out on my largest cookie sheet (ungreased) Greased the blade of a thin sharp knife to slice and put 1/2 in lg muffin cups and 1/2 in a round pan I did not spread w any addtl butter before rolling (enough for me in the recipe) Let rise 30 mins then started the oven They rose nicely and were ready in about 20 mins Light insides, just like a dinner roll Was making turkey burgers for dinner last night and forgot I had 3 of these rolls left Wished I had made the burgers small enough for sliders Well after cooking the burgers I cut the edges off mine to fit the size of the roll Split the roll in half, added my burger and had a slider afterall! My husband had to copy and we loved it! Now I’m going to make 1/2 of the next batch into buns

    Reply
    1. The Baker's Hotline

      Cooking and baking is sometimes all about improvising. Right Linda? I am happy you like this recipe! Elisabeth@KAF

  43. Linda

    For years in my ‘regular’ baking I often sub olive oil for veg or other oils in a recipe I have to watch when baking however because items always brown a little faster than normal When making these rolls next, I am going to sub a Tbsp or two of olive oil for some of the butter Bet these babies’ll brown up just fine

    Reply

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